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When to use them?
Does anybody know?
New Member10
Such a wide open question. But, hey, I like to talk.

Use a semi-colon to connect two related independent clauses.

"They took the money from the vault; they took it quickly."

-Related ideas, clauses stand on their own, semi-colon is OK.

Use a comma to separate clauses and items in lists.

"Since I had such a great day, I decided to spend all the money on my wife, my mistress, and my girlfriend."

Use a colon to separate equal things (like an = sign).

"Just remember three things: be on time, bring the money, and come alone."

-here things = those three items.
Full Member199
How do I know if they are independent clauses? Should they be able to stand on their own?
For example:
I like apple pie_______________not liking apple pie would make me silly.

Is the second part an independent clause? I would think a comma would work in this case, but then I think I would have a comma splice...
New Member08
Anonymous:
plz explain; how to use might in the sentence and verbal
Anonymous:
England went through globalization in the 1930s the English people felt angry towards the US.Emotion: smile
Hi,

England went through globalization in the 1930s the English people felt angry towards the US

England went through globalization in the 1930s. The English people felt angry towards the US.

Next time, please try to post your question about your sentence. eg Is this correct, please?

Best wishes, Clive
Veteran Member69,502
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Anonymous:
England went through globalization in the 1930s; this made the English people feel angry towards the US.

"To join independent clauses in compound sentences that do not have coordinating conjunctions (and, or, but, nor, for, so, yet) and commas as connectors."
-Source: http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/punct/col-semi.html
Anonymous:
mindserveow do I know if they are independent clauses? Should they be able to stand on their own?
For example:
I like apple pie_______________not liking apple pie would make me silly.
Is the second part an independent clause? I would think a comma would work in this case, but then I think I would have a comma splice...
Yes, it is an independent clause. The subject ("not liking apple pie") is a little unusual, but it is a subject just as "liking apple pie" or "skiing" or "shopping" would be. Use a semicolon.
Anonymous:
ryan smithSuch a wide open question. But, hey, I like to talk.
Use a semi-colon to connect two related independent clauses.
"They took the money from the vault; they took it quickly."
-Related ideas, clauses stand on their own, semi-colon is OK.
Use a comma to separate clauses and items in lists.
"Since I had such a great day, I decided to spend all the money on my wife, my mistress, and my girlfriend."
Use a colon to separate equal things (like an = sign).
"Just remember three things: be on time, bring the money, and come alone."
-here things = those three items.
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