Should it be doctors appointment OR doctor's appointment?

This is a discussion thread · 28 replies
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Anonymous:
I can't work out which to use. Is it doctor's appointment because it is an appointment with the doctor and is an appointment belonging to the doctor?
AnonymousI can't work out which to use. Is it doctor's appointment because it is an appointment with the doctor and is an appointment belonging to the doctor?

Neither. It should be, as you have written: an appointment with the doctor.
Veteran Member8,069
Anonymous:
One problem. I don't have space to write the full sentence. In speech, people say doctors appointment and this is what I need to write but I feel like I should add an apostrophe.
It should be "doctor's appointment."
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Anonymous:
Thanks!
YoungCalifornianIt should be "doctor's appointment."

I would like to confirm.

Do we say, "I've a doctor's appointment" OR "I've an appointment with a doctor"?

Many thanks.
AnonymousOne problem. I don't have space to write the full sentence...
Yoong Liat I would like to confirm. Do we say, "I've a doctor's appointment" OR "I've an appointment with a doctor"?
Hi Yoong,

I guess there's been a misunderstanding. The original poster wasn't looking for a complete sentence.
S/he probably needed just a phrase ... you know, the sort of thing you would write in a quick note, in a title or in a table (as the name of a field).
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Hi Tanit

Thanks for pointing out the misunderstanding. I tend to see queries from a grammatical point of view.
Anonymous:
"Doctor's appointment" would be correct usage.

This phrase, to a native speaker, sounds right but is constructed strangely when analyzed. For most phrases of this type, you would use an adjective as the first word (such as "dental appointment") or you would describe the item being examined ("eye appointment").

The possesive "doctor's" in this case serves more to create an adjective than to express ownership (effectively saying "[doctor-type] appointment"). As an alternative, you could say "medical appointment".

"Doctors appointment" would be wrong. "Doctor appointment" might be correct, but I almost never hear it used that way.
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