Should it be "inconvenience caused" or "inconvenience cause"?

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Sammo:
Hi All,
I was releasing an announcement my company that it is as following:

ITD will perform routine check on our company's Internet connection during lunch time (1:00pm - 2:00pm) on 19th July 2006. During this time, Internet connection may be lost. We are sorry for any inconvenience cause. Should you have any problem, please contact the IT helpdesk for any assistance. Thank you.
but yet my Manager correct me the "inconvenience cause" should be "inconvenience caused". However, the I think the "inconvenience" have not been "caused". It is something will "cause". So I argue with him that it should be "inconvenience cause". He said it is a passive. But I can't see any verb to be in the phrase.
What I want to ask is, for an announcement like this. Should it be "inconvenience cause" or "inconvenience caused"?
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Richard Yates:
'Caused. No question. There are several other small errors in the text (corrections are in square brackets):
[nq:1]ITD will perform (a) routine check on (of) our company's Internet connection during lunch time (1:00pm - 2:00pm) on 19th ... ('caused' or 'this causes'). Should you have anyproblem, please contact the IT helpdesk for any (delete 'any') assistance. Thank you.[/nq]
What is your primary language?
Richard Yates
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Sammo:
Chinese
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Rob Lindauer:
[nq:1]Chinese[/nq]
Rather than saying "...We are sorry for any inconvenience cause(d)...," I'd probably just say "We are sorry for any inconvenience."

If you really want to get "cause(d)" into the sentence, I'd say "...We are sorry for any inconvenience caused by this problem." The "...by this problem..." is implied in the original sentence and may help you see why (for me, at least) "caused" fits better.

Rob Lindauer - Please change "att" to "sbc" for my real email address
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Sammo:
Thanks for you and Richard's reply!!
I have no doubt after seeing your reply~~
Rob Lindauer =E5=AF=AB=E9=81=93=EF=BC=9A
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JPG:
[nq:1]'Caused. No question. There are several other small errors in the text (corrections are in square brackets):[/nq]
[nq:2]ITD will perform (a) routine check on (of) our company's Internet connection during lunch time (1:00pm - 2:00pm) on 19th July 2006. ('19[/nq]
[nq:1]July 2006' or 'July 19th, 2006')[/nq]
In British English 19th July is acceptable as a shortened version of 19th of July
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Odysseus:
[nq:1]I was releasing an announcement my company that it is as following: ITD will perform routine check on our company's ... be "inconvenience cause". He said it is a passive. But I can't see any verb to be in the phrase.[/nq]
Your manager's correction is good, but I'm not sure about his justification. I wouldn't call "caused" a passive verb here; it's a participle, which (although indeed formed from a verb) functions as an adjective. However, one might regard "caused" as an ellipsis of "that may be caused (thereby)" and accordingly to imply a passive construction.
[nq:1]What I want to ask is, for an announcement like this. Should it be "inconvenience cause" or "inconvenience caused"?[/nq]
The latter, but you could also say "We are sorry for any inconvenience (that) this (interruption/maintenance) may cause." Idiom doesn't permit the omission of the entire subject or of the auxiliary verb here, at least not to my ear.

Odysseus
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mm:
[nq:2]'Caused. No question. There are several other small errors in the text (corrections are in square brackets): July 2006' or 'July 19th, 2006')[/nq]
[nq:1]In British English 19th July is acceptable as a shortened version of 19th of July[/nq]
The poster never did say what his audience was. Maybe he should think about his audience and tell us who it is right off the bat, the next time.
[nq:2]any problem, please contact the IT What is your primary language? Richard Yates[/nq]
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let
me know if you have posted also.
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Sammo:
Yes...actually my sister did say the same as yours...but she is not so sure about that.
Odysseus =E5=AF=AB=E9=81=93=EF=BC=9A
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