Sofa VS Couch?

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When I was in Canada, I heard most people say 'couch' to mean 'sofa', actually, i never heard Canadians use 'sofa'. Is sofa an outdated word? Or is this a Canadian thing? Which word is used in US or UK?

The Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary give couch this definition:

couch (SEAT) Show phonetics
noun [C]
a sofa
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You may have the patience to read this instructive thread:
http://tinyurl.com/jp2j6
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Marius HancuYou may have the patience to read this instructive thread:


And if you don't have the patience, here's a brief but rather accurate answer to your question. Sofa, couch, divan, davenport, chesterfield and the smaller size loveseat are all the same piece of future. Chesterfield is the only one that I know of that is not used in at least some places in the US (but is very common in Canada). Can't speak for UK.
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I think the point is that in all English-speaking countries there is a variety of valid words, but each country has its own view of what sounds usual, what sounds out of date etc. These variations are particularly noticeable in domestic situations (cooking terms, items of furniture) and in the more traditional jobs. In this case, as a Brit, I know "sofa" and "settee" (which was originally "settle"), while "divan" and "couch" sound less common, but I believe "couch" is more used in North America.
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Hmmm... I'm not sure which I use more, "couch" or "sofa". I use both a lot.
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J LewisI think the point is that in all English-speaking countries there is a variety of valid words, but each country has its own view of what sounds usual, what sounds out of date etc. These variations are particularly noticeable in domestic situations (cooking terms, items of furniture) and in the more traditional jobs. In this case, as a Brit, I know "sofa" and "settee" (which was originally "settle"), while "divan" and "couch" sound less common, but I believe "couch" is more used in North America.
Canadian vs. US use of "napkin", for example!
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HI, Philip:

What do you mean by "Canada Vs US, napkin"? Do you mean the two countries use napkin

differently? I heard people say "kleenex" to mean napkins, and it is very popular.
In the U.S., a napkin is something that you put in your lap at the table. In the U.K., I think (please corret me) this is a serviette?

In the U.K., as I understand it, a napkin is what goes on a baby's bottom to collect what comes out of the baby. In the U.S., this is called a diaper.

I'm not sure which one Canada uses.

Kleenex is a brand name for tissues, that flimsy paper that you blow your nose into.
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According to Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

napkin Show phonetics
noun [C] (UK ALSO serviette)
a small square piece of cloth or paper used while you are eating for protecting your clothes or to clean your mouth or fingers

so can napkin mean sth i use to clean my mouth after a meal?
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