Spelling and usage of 'soo-ee' pig call?

This is a discussion thread · 4 replies
Jeremy Smith:
Hi Folks,
In the States, especially in the South, ‘sooee' is used for calling pigs.
Does anyone know if there is a standardized spelling for this? I see mostly sooee and soo-ee. I also see questions about whether it's pronounced soo-ee or soo-ey.
And, do folks in the UK also use this for calling pigs?

Thanks,
Jeremy >-)
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Don Aitken:
[nq:1]In the States, especially in the South, ‘sooee' is used for calling pigs. Does anyone know if there is a ... questions about whether it's pronounced soo-ee or soo-ey. And, do folks in the UK also use this for calling pigs?[/nq]
It's "Hooey" over here, at least according to P.G.Wodehouse. I suspect that it varies regionally; calls used with cattle certainly do.

Don Aitken
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
mb:
...
[nq:1]It's "Hooey" over here, at least according to P.G.Wodehouse. I suspect that it varies regionally; calls used with cattle certainly do.[/nq]
PGW's "hooey" was an American import into Shropshire.
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Mike Bandy:
[nq:1]Hi Folks, In the States, especially in the South, ?sooee' is used for calling pigs.[/nq]
Calling pigs ... Sooee, with a rising pitch. My grandmother taught me how to make the sound.
Your message brings back fond memories from about forty-five years ago. I'm writing this with tears in my eyes. I hadn't thought of sooee for decades. Why would I?
I remember hauling the slop bucket out to the pigs. That five-gallon pail was pretty heavy for a little boy. I can't imagine why anyone would call pigs today. I'm sure it has nothing to do with a slop bucket, though.
Well, I took a break and calmed down. I didn't know AUE could be this intense. I'm my (stodgy) self again.
My grandmother didn't teach me how to spell the word, Jeremy, but I like "sooee." In further answer to your question about the history of the word, my grandparents were Norwegians, and my memories were of South Dakota.
I don't know what you mean about the difference between soo-ee and soo-ey. My description of how the sound was made (with a rising pitch) isn't quite accurate, but I'm not going to let old Stodgy edit it. Writing this message meant a lot to me. Thank you for reading it.

Mike Bandy
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Mike Lyle:
[nq:1]I remember hauling the slop bucket out to the pigs. That five-gallon pail was pretty heavy for a little boy. I can't imagine why anyone would call pigs today. I'm sure it has nothing to do with a slop bucket, though.[/nq]
My pigs never needed calling: all you had to do was look slightly as though you might have food about your person.
[nq:1]Writing this message meant a lot to me. Thank you for reading it.[/nq]
I liked reading it. And anyhow, we swineherds we divine swineherds, as Homer knew us to be must stick together.

Mike.
This thread originates from within 'usenet', and as such the content and users are not guaranteed to have been moderated by our community.
Live chat
Registered users can join here