Squoze for squeezed?

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Matti Lamprhey:
There I was watching a chap being interviewed about problems in the British haulage industry, when he brought me up short with a very strange word.
"These container lorry businesses are really being squoze nowadays."

I can't find it in NSOED at all, but when I google it I find many examples. Most are meta-examples, in the sense that they are marvelling at the strangeness of the word just like I am now, rather than being natural in-the-wild usages. It seems to occur in all English-speaking countries.
I'm guessing that this might be most common in the Midlands the interview was conducted in Ashton-in-Makerfield.
Actually the chap used it twice, and the first time it seemed to represent "squeezes" rather than "squeezed".
Matti
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Qp10qp:
[nq:1]Subject: Squoze for squeezed? From: "Matti Lamprhey" There I was watching a chap being interviewed about problems in the British ... squoze nowadays." I'm guessing that this might be most common in the Midlands the interview was conducted in Ashton-in-Makerfield.[/nq]
That's near Wigan - the north, surely.
It just sounds like an illiteracy to me, though I suppose it could be a localism. If such a word existed, it should be "squozen", in my opinion, absurdly speaking.
Peasemarch.
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Matti Lamprhey:
[nq:1]That's near Wigan - the north, surely.[/nq]
Er yes, of course you're right. The chap sounded more Midlands than Northwestern, though, so perhaps he was a transplant. (Was I thinking of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, perhaps?)
[nq:1]It just sounds like an illiteracy to me, though I suppose it could be a localism. If such a word existed, it should be "squozen", in my opinion, absurdly speaking.[/nq]
You mean it should be "He squoze the lemons / the lemons were squozen", I assume. That would seem to be a suitable pattern.

Matti
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the Omrud:
Qp10qp typed thus:
[nq:2]Subject: Squoze for squeezed? From: "Matti Lamprhey" There I was ... in the Midlands the interview was conducted in Ashton-in-Makerfield.[/nq]
[nq:1]That's near Wigan - the north, surely.[/nq]
Yes, between St Helens and Salford. Not to be confused with the many other Ashtons around. It used to have a large open cast coal mine in the days when we still had mines.
[nq:1]It just sounds like an illiteracy to me, though I suppose it could be a localism. If such a word existed, it should be "squozen", in my opinion, absurdly speaking.[/nq]
If I have ever heard this I would have put it down as real or feigned childish speech.

David
==
replace the first component of address
with the definite article.
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Matti Lamprhey:
Here's the chap (30 secs, 280KB) saying it twice:
http://www.meticula.plus.com/Sounds/squoze.mp3
Matti
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John Dean:
[nq:2]Subject: Squoze for squeezed? From: "Matti Lamprhey" There I was ... in the Midlands the interview was conducted in Ashton-in-Makerfield.[/nq]
[nq:1]That's near Wigan - the north, surely. It just sounds like an illiteracy to me, though I suppose it could be a localism. If such a word existed, it should be "squozen", in my opinion, absurdly speaking. Peasemarch.[/nq]
I've heard it many a time Oop North.
OED knows it :
" Squeeze - Also 7 squeez, squeaze, squease, squese, 7-8 squeese. Also with dial. preterite and pa. pple. 9- squoze, pa. pple. 9 squozen. (perh. a strengthened form of quease v.1 Cf. also squize v.) Cites for 'squoze' both sides of the pond last century and the one before.

John Dean
Oxford
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Ben Zimmer:
[nq:1]OED knows it : " Squeeze - Also 7 squeez, squeaze, squease, squese, 7-8 squeese. Also with dial. preterite and ... quease v.1 Cf. also squize v.) Cites for 'squoze' both sides of the pond last century and the one before.[/nq]
It also turns up in The Columbia Guide to Standard American English :

http://www.bartleby.com/68/93/5693.html
squoze
is a Nonstandard dialectal form of the weak verb , used jocularly in Casual contexts in place of the Standard past tense or past participle form, . Analogy with the past tense of , , probably accounts for it.
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Steve Hayes:
[nq:1]There I was watching a chap being interviewed about problems in the British haulage industry, when he brought me up ... word just like I am now, rather than being natural in-the-wild usages. It seems to occur in all English-speaking countries.[/nq]
I would say "squozen" by analogy with "frozen" and "proven".

I also regard it as jocular, like "snuck".
But you repeat such a joke in your kids' hearing, and they grow up thinking it's normal usage, like casting nasturtiums.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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Mike Lyle:
[nq:2]There I was watching a chap being interviewed about problems ... in-the-wild usages. It seems to occur in all English-speaking countries.[/nq]
[nq:1]I would say "squozen" by analogy with "frozen" and "proven". I also regard it as jocular, like "snuck". But you repeat such a joke in your kids' hearing, and they grow up thinking it's normal usage, like casting nasturtiums.[/nq]
Is it my increasingly faulty memory, or isn't it also a Winnie-the-Poohism? I associate it with Owl's falling house: "It doesn't seem fair to a friendly bear, to flatten him out with a basket chair"
"...a sort of squtch, that's much too much, for his eyes, and his ears, and his nose, and such"
In any case, our family have always used it in our private conversation.
Mike.
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