"has taken place" vs "has been taken place"?

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Anonymous:
Hi all,

can someone explain me the difference between "has taken place" and "has been taken place" please?
Examle:
The parade has been taken / has taken place.

I can not figure out which form is correct.

Many thanks,
Max
Approved answer (verified by )
Anonymousthe difference between "has taken place" and "has been taken place" please?
There is no "has been taken place". It doesn't exist in English.

CJ
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I think you might have slightly misheard here.

The parade has been taking place at the village/at 2.30/at the first Sunday of April. Something that has been happening in the past on mre that one point in time.

The parade has taken place. Happened once or one occurance is relevent to the sentence. The parade has taken place this year.
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Anonymous:
I don't know if there is an exception. In the computer program, it's quite frequent that we see 'error is occured due to....'. Well, 'is occured' seems to exist. In this context, I would interpret such thing as 'is caused', 'is incurred', etc. Similarly, 'photosynthesis is taken place....' could mean 'photosynthesis is caused by....'. Another example is 'to know the cause-effect relationships taken place in the sample', it sounds better if we use 'have taken place' or 'taking place', but once deliberately interpreted, it could mean 'the cause-effect being brought about in the sample' and it seems right in another way.

Just my comment.
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