Tea Totaller?

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What does "Tea Tottaller" mean?
New Member21
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'Teetotaler' is from the letter t (as in total) + total + -er. Teetotalism is the complete abstinence from alcoholic drinks.

If your spelling is accurate, 'tea totaller' may be word-play on the original, and may be someone who drinks only tea.
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Anonymous:
Its pronounced as Tea Totaller but is spelled as Teetotaller. Teetotller is a person who refrains from drinking intoxicating beverages or who is a non drinker for alcholic bevergaes.
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Anonymous:
Actually, the term is 'tea totaller' and it means people who NEVER drink alcohol of any kind, beer, wine, anything with alcohol in it... therefore the word implies they only drank tea.
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AnonymousActually, the term is 'tea totaller' and it means people who NEVER drink alcohol of any kind, beer, wine, anything with alcohol in it... therefore the word implies they only drank tea.
ORIGIN emphatic extension of TOTAL, apparently first used by Richard Turner, a worker from Preston, in a speech (1833) urging total abstinence from all alcohol.

teetotal "pledged to total abstinence from intoxicating drink," 1834, possibly formed from total with a reduplication of the initial T- for emphasis (T-totally "totally," not in an abstinence sense, is recorded in Kentucky dialect from 1832 and is possibly older in Irish-Eng.). The use in temperance jargon was first noted Sept. 1833 in a speech advocating total abstinence (from beer as well as wine and liquor) by Richard "Dicky" Turner, a working-man from Preston, England. Also said to have been introduced in 1827 in a New York temperance society which recorded a T after the signature of those who had pledged total abstinence, but contemporary evidence for this is wanting, and Webster (1847) calls teetotaler "a cant word formed in England."
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Anonymous:
One who does not partake of alcholic beverages
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Anonymous:
One whom does not consume alcoholic beverages.
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Anonymous
One whom does not consume alcoholic beverages.

I think we can close this thread now. There have certainly been enough answers given over the years.
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