RE: The eve of an eve of an eve of .. page 3

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Matti Lamprhey:
[nq:2]Comma after "Now."[/nq]
[nq:1]The omission of that comma has been one of my pet peeves. Some of the best writers contributing to this group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.[/nq]
I find this astonishing. In dialogue I would not make the slightest pause after the "Now" unless I was portraying someone of restricted mentality. No pause no comma.
Matti
commaphile
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Skitt:
[nq:2]The omission of that comma has been one of my ... group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.[/nq]
[nq:1]I find this astonishing. In dialogue I would not make the slightest pause after the "Now" unless I was portraying someone of restricted mentality. No pause no comma.[/nq]
The above example
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Skitt:
[nq:2]The omission of that comma has been one of my ... group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.[/nq]
[nq:1]I find this astonishing. In dialogue I would not make the slightest pause after the "Now" unless I was portraying someone of restricted mentality. No pause no comma.[/nq]
There should be a slight pause, unless you mean the "now" in a temporal sense in other words, if you mean that it is only now that it is *beyond cruel and uncalled-for", but it wasn't so before.
Maybe it is not so much a pause, but rather an emphasis on the second word of that sentence something difficult to indicate in writing, lest it be by the use of a comma.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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R F:
[nq:2]Comma after "Now."[/nq]
[nq:1]The omission of that comma has been one of my pet peeves. Some of the best writers contributing to this group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.[/nq]
I'm with Matti (for just this once). No pause, no comma. No peace, no justice.
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Dena Jo :
[nq:1]I find this astonishing. In dialogue I would not make the slightest pause after the "Now" unless I was portraying someone of restricted mentality. No pause no comma.[/nq]
A throwaway "now" at the beginning of a sentence takes a comma.

Dena Jo
(Email: Replace TPUBGTH with denajo2)
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Dena Jo :
[nq:1]The omission of that comma has been one of my pet peeves. Some of the best writers contributing to this group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.[/nq]
My comma pet peeve is the omission of the comma before a noun of address.

Dena Jo
(Email: Replace TPUBGTH with denajo2)
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Skitt:
[nq:2]The omission of that comma has been one of my ... group are guilty of it. I think they are commaphobic.[/nq]
[nq:1]I'm with Matti (for just this once). No pause, no comma. No peace, no justice.[/nq]
Don't you put one after the "well" in sentences like "Well, that's it"? Same difference.
I'm glad I wasn't wrong about the "best writers" part. Two and counting ...
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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Carmen L. Abruzzi:
On 11/1/03 7:50 PM, in article

I've never heard "eve" used to mean anything other than "the day before" in American English. I think you Brits came up with this "corruption" all on your own. I think one must admit, though, that "eve" for "the day before" is not less than a little confusing. Apart from the pseudo-traditions of the Christian Church, the word is nothing other than the original word meaning "evening", just as "morn" is the original word meaning "morning". If one reckons days from midnight to midnight, then the "eve" of a day should come after that day's "morn", not before.
[nq:2]It makes good sense to me. What do you Brits call it, Antehalloween?[/nq]
[nq:1]It'd make sense if it was usually used to mean what you think it means. In fact, "Halloween Eve" usually ... of usage should have a name - "Greetings-card English"? As you and I both know, "eve" means "the day before".[/nq]
Which is, of course, a corruption of an earlier meaning; "the evening before". This is a reflection of the Jewish calendar day's beginning at sunset, so that a feast day or holy day began at sunset of what for us would be "the day before" the actual holy day. The "true" meaning of "eve" is the same as that of "evening" (which is an unnecessary expansion), that is, the time after sunset. If one reckons days from midnight to midnight, then clearly the "eve" of a day comes after the morning of that day.
[nq:1]Most marketing people don't give a stuff about the integrity of the language though (and most of them left school at 12 so they're able to operate in blissful ignorance of any facts about their culture which might intrude on the traditions they invent[/nq]
Hey, the same is true of the monks who invented All Saint's Day. Except they were kept in "school" from the age of seven, and depended on it for their sustenance.
[nq:1]to grow some other heathen's business), which is I guess how such twee bollocks as "Halloween Eve" is given wings.[/nq]
Oh, the irony! Was not "All Saint's Day" invented by the Christian Church to distract attention from the traditional "heathen" holy day?

Why should we now follow such pseudo-tradtions when we are free to get back to true traditions?
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Matti Lamprhey:
[nq:2]I find this astonishing. In dialogue I would not make ... portraying someone of restricted mentality. No pause no comma.[/nq]
[nq:1]A throwaway "now" at the beginning of a sentence takes a comma.[/nq]
Why?
I know you won't say "Because it does", so I won't bother to warn you not to even think about doing so.
Matti
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