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Hello everyone!

I will be glad if you can help me to understand the meaning of the sentences below:

Try as I might, I couldn't pass the exam. --- Here is my guess: Although I tried hard, I couldn't pass the exam. If my gues is right, could you explain to me what does might here stand for? I mean, is this a reduction? And what about as? Was it used as because?

I wish you ...... me got worried, as now I won't be able to help crying. --- A) won't tell B) don't tell C) haven't told D)aren't telling E) hadn't told My guess: C . I really didn't understand this sentence! Especially this part: I wish you.. me got worried. Why me got? What kind of a reduction this is? In fact , is this a reduction?

Thanks in advance.Emotion: smile
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Hi Doll

Your interpretation of 'Try as I might' is perfect, but 'as' does not mean 'because'. I'd say you could look at 'Try as I might' this way:

Even though I tried as hard as I possibly could

Your second sentence doesn't make sense to me either. It's probably a typographical error.

You could say 'I wish you hadn't told me...' or 'I wish you hadn't got me worried...'
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DollHello everyone!

I will be glad if you can help me to understand the meaning of the sentences below:

Try as I might, I couldn't pass the exam. --- Here is my guess: Although I tried hard, I couldn't pass the exam. If my gues is right, could you explain to me what does might here stand for? I mean, is this a reduction? And what about as? Was it used as because? "As hard as I may try (might have tried - in the past)" is the complete phrase. It's an odd phrase, but you have the meaning correct.

I wish you ...... me got worried, as now I won't be able to help crying. --- A) won't tell B) don't tell C) haven't told D)aren't telling E) hadn't told My guess: C . I really didn't understand this sentence! Especially this part: I wish you.. me got worried. Why me got? What kind of a reduction this is? In fact , is this a reduction? E is the correct answer.

Thanks in advance.Emotion: smile
But the sentence needs some general refining: I wish you hadn't told me (and) [got me worried] or [worried me]. Past perfect tense: you told me before I got worried. The part highlighted in yellow doesn't fit. Hoşca kal, arkadaşım.
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Hi,

Try as I might, I couldn't pass the exam. --- Here is my guess: Although I tried hard, I couldn't pass the exam. If my gues is right, could you explain to me what does might here stand for? I mean, is this a reduction? And what about as? Was it used as because?

It means that I tried as hard as I might have, meaning as hard as I could have. There was no possibility that I might have tried more.

I wish you ...... me got worried, as now I won't be able to help crying. --- A) won't tell B) don't tell C) haven't told D)aren't telling E) hadn't told My guess: C . I really didn't understand this sentence! Especially this part: I wish you.. me got worried. Why me got? What kind of a reduction this is? In fact , is this a reduction?

Are you sure you have typed this question correctly? It seems odd, and none of the choices fit.

It seems to be intended to read as I wish you hadn't got me worried, as now I won't be able to help crying.

Or perhaps I wish you hadn't made me get worried, as now I won't be able to help crying.

Does this make the meaning more clear to you?

Best wishes, Clive
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Thank you for all your replies, they are vey helpful. I understood the meaning of the sentences very well and I am sure that I wrote the second sentence as it was written on the test I saw.(I checked it twice) Anyway, it is not important because it was not a successful test at all.Emotion: smile

By the way, dear Philip it is hoşçakal not hoşça kal.Emotion: big smile I kiss your hands ( here it is a tradition) and take care.
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I see "try as I might" as the survival of an old 'subjunctivy sort of thing' Emotion: smile related mostly to subordinators of concession used withmay or might. though, even though, although, as, no matter ... Also, in another category, the older word lest.

Try as I may, I won't pass the exam.
Try as I might, I didn't pass the exam.
Try though you may, you'll never be able to jump to the moon.
Try though he might, he never mastered the Queztl-Xicheztl language.
No matter how hard you (may/might) try, ...
[Though / Although / Even though] I (may/might) try, there's no way that ...
[Though / Although / Even though] you (may/might) question my reasons for saying so, I believe that ...

Worry though he may, it won't help a bit.
Worry though he might, it didn't help a bit.

Lest you (may/might) think I'm exaggerating, let me provide further evidence of this strange phenomenon.
The younger members of the family resisted selling the farm, lest Grandfather (might) object.

CJ
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Thank you CalifJim for this good explanation. I really don't understand why people insist on teaching old forms of English. Emotion: smile
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Hi Doll

Expressions such as 'Try as I might' are more or less remnants of older forms. However, that does not mean these remnants are not used. .
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Thanks for the information Yankee, I thought they are not used any more.Emotion: smile
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