1 2 3
Anonymous:
What does "suit yourself" mean? I foujn this nifty thread and got all confused: http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/31/messages/1140.html

I always thought it meant "you've got yourself to blame". If someone who went to bed @ 4a.m. complains "Damn I'm so tired", I reply "suit yourself, you stayed up all night". Is this wrong?

If it's wrong, then what's the correct phrase for "you've only got yourself to blame".?
I think you need:

"This should suit yourself, you stayed up all night"

which is different from "suit yourself / do what you want"" which is well discussed at that link.

But some could confuse them.
Veteran Member11,673
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
"This should suit yourself, you stayed up all night" In my opinion, "this should suit yourself" is neither grammatical nor idiomatic. "Yourself" refers back to the subject of the sentence, which has to be "you," not "this." (I please myself, you please yourself, he pleases himself.)

The way to say "you have no one to blame but yourself" is . . . well, "you have no one to blame but yourself." A very informal version would be "It's your own fault."
Veteran Member6,431
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
Saska, "suit yourself" is used to mean "make a choice that pleases you, even though others might not agree."

You want a pizza with pineapple on it? Okay, suit yourself.

As Khoff has said, if you want to say "it's your own fault" you can say "You have no one but yourself to blame" or "You have only yourself to blame."

Note that "It suits you" is completely different. That means that it works well for you. That's a nice dress. It really suits your figure.
Veteran Member27,495
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.Trusted Users: Trusted users are allowed to use additional capabilities of the site such as private messaging to all users and various other advanced features. You cannot join this role unless you are promoted by an administrator.
Khoff"This should suit yourself, you stayed up all night" In my opinion, "this should suit yourself" is neither grammatical nor idiomatic. "Yourself" refers back to the subject of the sentence, which has to be "you," not "this." (I please myself, you please yourself, he pleases himself.)

The way to say "you have no one to blame but yourself" is . . . well, "you have no one to blame but yourself." A very informal version would be "It's your own fault."
Yes, I think you're right about "yourself." I still think I've heard:

"This should suit you, you stayed up all night" (ironical, for "you deserve it").
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
"This should suit you, you stayed up all night" (ironical, for "you deserve it"). \

Yes, that way would make sense.
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
In BrE, "suit yourself!" (i.e. "do whatever suits you") implies "do what you want; I no longer wish to discuss it".

I don't think we have "This should suit you", over here (except in gentlemen's outfitters).

MrP
Veteran Member12,806
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
"this should suit you"

although that phrase technically makes sense, it is unnatural sounding and is not a manner in which an english person would speak.

For this second phrase it would be more typical to say:

"serves you right!, you stayed up all night"

In terms of the first phrase in question "suit yourself"

It is not normally used in the way you have suggested, it seems you have become mixed up with "serves you right" which I just described.

If you offer a person a seat to sit down, and they decline and choose to stand. You might say "suit yourself"

the phrase is normally used when someone declines a polite offer.

It is normally a light hearted, friendly/polite phrase but in some instances can be used in arguments.
New Member18
Yes, the tone of voice is important. It usually sounds quite huffy or dismissive.

MrP
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
Show more
Live chat
Registered users can join here