The study of a language can be divided into:
1: Grammar
2: Linguistics

Grammar is more concerned how a language is used in communication, while linuistics addresses the workings and development of a language.

Is the above information correct? Please let me know.
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Are you asking about grammar and linguistics, or do you want to know whether the sentences in your post are grammatically correct?
If you are asking about linguistics, then this should go in another section.

Anyway, that distinction isn't correct. The study of grammar is part of linguistics. Linguistics is the scientific study of language. You can find lots of general information and general definitions on Wikipedia, if you need to learn more.
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Hi Kooyeen

I'm not asking for correction of mistakes. Move it to any section you want!

Let me rephrase what I said previously:
Grammar is more concerned about how a language is used in communication, while linuistics addresses the workings and development of a language - therefore grammar also comes under the umbrella of linguistics. Therefore, a learner should concentrate on grammar rather than linguistics. It is up to you to decide if you just want to drive a car, or further have a look inside the workings of engine.
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Ok, I moved here in the linguistic section.
I'm not sure what you are asking though. You can find a definition of grammar on Wikipedia: - It is basically the set of rules that tell you how to make words, phrases, and sentences that make sense and sound natural in a language. It is part of linguistics, which is the scientific study of language.

If you are saying that a learner should only concentrate on grammar, then I don't agree, because grammar is only one part of the language. There are other branches of linguistics that are very important when learning a language.
Grammar might tell you that the following sentence is grammatically correct:
Do you want some pudding?
But grammar rules don't tell you what "pudding" means there. It might also have different meanings in different dialects. And it might be used as a euphemism or as some kind of slang word there. Grammar won't tell you that. The branch of linguistics that deals with those problems is called "semantics", I guess.
Another example might involve learning to write Chinese characters. How many strokes? How long? Which strokes must diagonal, horizontal, vertical? How should they be connected? Grammar won't tell anything like that. I think the branch of linguistics that deals with that is called "orthography".

That's why I don't think grammar is the only thing that matters. However, not all linguistics is necessary when learning a language. For example, a learner doesn't need to know anything about historical linguistics (etymology, history of a language, etc.)
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Thanks a lot, Kooyeen. I will take some time to assimilate the information before moving on to further questions.

I see, you have stopped degrading the language. Have you been freed of your ignorance, or is it just that you have relinquished your goal?
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KooyeenYou can find a definition of grammar on Wikipedia: - It is basically the set of rules that tell you how to make words, phrases, and sentences that make sense and sound natural in a language. It is part of linguistics, which is the scientific study of language.
Hi, again

Why did you use dash '-' instead of a period? I think grammar's sphere goes beyond what most of us think - it also includes semnatics, pragmatics, phonetics, etc.

In linguistics, grammar is the set of structural rules that govern the composition of sentences, phrases, and words in any given natural language. The term refers also to the study of such rules, and this field includes morphology, syntax, and phonology, often complemented by phonetics, semantics, and pragmatics. Linguists do not normally use the term to refer to orthographical rules, although usage books and style guides that call themselves grammars may also refer to spelling and punctuation.

Morphology

the study and description of how words are formed in language
the study of the morphemes of a language and of the way in which they are joined together to make words - the smallest unit of meaning in a language. The words 'so', 'the' and 'boy' consist of one morpheme. 'Boys' consists of two morphemes, 'boy' and 's'.:
the past tense morpheme
the plural morpheme

Syntax
the way words are arranged to form sentences or phrases, or the rules of grammar which control this

Phonology
the study of the system of speech sounds in a language, or the system of sounds itself

Phonetics
the science and study of speech sounds

For difference between phonology and phonetics look here:
http://www.yourdictionary.com/library/reference/differences-between-phonetics-and-phonology.html

Semantics
the study of the meaning of words and phrases

Pragmatics
the study of how words and phrases are used with special meanings in particular situations

Orthography
the way in which words are spelled
The orthography of a language specifies the correct way of using a specific writing system (script) to write the language. While "orthography" colloquially is often used synonymously with spelling, spelling is only part of orthography. Other elements of the field of orthography are hyphenation, capitalization, word breaks and punctuation.

Usage book
the way that words are used in a language
differentiating between standard and non-standard usage of words, etc.

Style
a way of using words or spelling that is considered correct (correct writing)
It's not good style to use abbreviations in an essay.
A style guide or style manual is a set of standards for the writing and design of documents, either for general use or for a specific publication, organization or field.
BBC News Style Guide
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Jackson6612Why did you use dash '-' instead of a period?
Personal choice. I don't like to put periods/full stops after links, lol.
Jackson6612I think grammar's sphere goes beyond what most of us think - it also includes semnatics, pragmatics, phonetics, etc.
Yeah, probably... even though I generally consider "grammar" to be mainly about "syntax" (and some "semantics")
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