The verb to describe the sound of frog

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gloria:
Dear all,
We know that cats meow, dogs bark, wolves howls and lion roars. Then what verb do we use to decribe the sound of frog? I google a possible answer, but in vain. Hope you can come up with an answer for me. Thanks in advance. With regards,
Gloria
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bert:
[nq:1]Dear all, We know that cats meow, dogs bark, wolves howls and lion roars. Then what verb do we use to decribe the sound of frog? I google a possible answer, but in vain. Hope you can come up with an answer for me.[/nq]
A frog usually croaks.
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the Omrud:
[nq:1]Dear all, We know that cats meow, dogs bark, wolves howls and lion roars. Then what verb do we use ... possible answer, but in vain. Hope you can come up with an answer for me. Thanks in advance. With regards,[/nq]
A frog croaks. Of course, some frogs don't literally croak - I remember my first encounter with the sound of bullfrogs in the USA. I thought they must be some huge mammal.

David
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Don Phillipson:
[nq:2]Dear all, We know that cats meow, dogs bark, wolves ... Hope you can come up with an answer for me.[/nq]
[nq:1]A frog usually croaks.[/nq]
Yes indeed, for English but the words for animal sounds often vary with language. The only Greek known by many English speakers is "brekekekek coax coax," the frog call as written by classic playwright Aristophanes. In America small frogs are called peepers because their sound is "peep."

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
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Steve Hayes:
[nq:1]Dear all, We know that cats meow, dogs bark, wolves howls and lion roars. Then what verb do we use ... possible answer, but in vain. Hope you can come up with an answer for me. Thanks in advance. With regards,[/nq]
Croak.
Granny, make a noise like a frog.
Why, Johnny?
Daddy says we'll get a lot of money when you croak.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/stevesig.htm
Blog: http://methodius.blogspot.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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musika:
[nq:1]Dear all, We know that cats meow, dogs bark, wolves howls[/nq]
wolves howl (a wolf howls)
and lion roars.
lions roar (a lion roars)
Then
[nq:1]what verb do we use to decribe the sound of frog? I google a possible answer, but in vain. Hope you can come up with an answer for me. Thanks in advance. With regards,[/nq]
frogs croak (a frog croaks)

Ray
UK
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Peter Moylan:
[nq:2]Dear all, We know that cats meow, dogs bark, wolves ... Hope you can come up with an answer for me.[/nq]
[nq:1]A frog usually croaks.[/nq]
A chook walks into a library and says "book, book". The librarian, curious to see what will happen, puts a book down in front of the chook. The chook picks up the book and walks out.
Half an hour later, the chook is back with the book in its beak. It drops the book on the floor and says "book, book". So the librarian gives it another book.
Half an hour later, the chook is back once again. And again after another half hour. This time, the librarian decides to follow the chook to see what is going on.
Well, the chook goes down the road with the librarian following. Then down another road, and so on until they get to a river.

At the side of the river is a frog. The chook goes up to the frog, drops the book in front of it, and says "book, book".
And the frog says "reddit, reddit".

Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org For an e-mail address, see my web page.
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Nick:
[nq:1]Yes indeed, for English but the words for animal sounds often vary with language. The only Greek known by many English speakers is "brekekekek coax coax," the frog call as written by classic playwright Aristophanes.[/nq]
Now I'm suffering from stuck major-general syndrome.
Online waterways route planner: http://canalplan.org.uk development version: http://canalplan.eu
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Roland Hutchinson:
[nq:2]Now I'm suffering from stuck major-general syndrome.[/nq]
[nq:1]Can you whistle all the airs from that infernal nonsense Pinafore , and if so may I watch?[/nq]
Clearly a case of the punishment fitting the crime.

Roland Hutchinson
He calls himself "the Garden State's leading violist da gamba," ... comparable to being ruler of an exceptionally small duchy. Newark (NJ) Star Ledger ( )
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