The word "gonna"

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Lepidopteran:
I'm gonna ask this question just once:
Is the word "gonna" proper English?
The word gonna probably started out as an unofficial contraction for the phrase "going to". Has this word been accepted by the style manuals as proper English? Or is it one of those non-standard/slang words (like "ain't") or even a non-word, like "irregardless".
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Skitt:
[nq:1]I'm gonna ask this question just once: Is the word "gonna" proper English? The word gonna probably started out as ... manuals as proper English? Or is it one of those non-standard/slang words (like "ain't") or even a non-word, like "irregardless".[/nq]
What'cha mean "non-word"? It be word, irregardless of what you say.

Look to the dictionary, my friend. It has the answers you seek. http://www.bartleby.com/61 /

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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R H Draney:
Lepidopteran filted:
[nq:1]I'm gonna ask this question just once: Is the word "gonna" proper English?[/nq]
It oughta be; I gotta wonder if you wanna make something of it..r
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Richard Sabey:
[nq:1]I'm gonna ask this question just once:[/nq]
...and I have a few more, on a similar contraction. Fill in each blank with the appropriate word that begins with the indicated first letter. For example
I'm g ask this question. Ans: gonna
1. I w ask you a question.
2. I can ask if I w .
3. I w answer from you.
[nq:1]Is the word "gonna" proper English? The word gonna probably started out as an unofficial contraction for the phrase "going ... manuals as proper English? Or is it one of those non-standard/slang words (like "ain't") or even a non-word, like "irregardless".[/nq]
Let's hear it for "ain't"! It's a convenient contraction for "am not", easier to say than "amn't", and without the grammatical error of "aren't I".
Webster's 3rd's usage note on "ain't" is interesting. In part, it reads:

though disapproved by many and more common in less educated speech, used orally in most parts of the U.S..
Some might have deemed this uncalled. Still, it's Merriam-Webster's judgement, and that's not to be sniffed.
Time to get outta here! (I wonder why a second "t" was added.)

Richard Sabey Visit the r.p.crosswords competition website cryptic fan at hotmail.com http://www.rsabey.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/rpc /
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Steve Hayes:
[nq:1]I'm gonna ask this question just once: Is the word "gonna" proper English? The word gonna probably started out as ... manuals as proper English? Or is it one of those non-standard/slang words (like "ain't") or even a non-word, like "irregardless".[/nq]
It's entirely different from "irregardless".
As you say, it's a contraction, and, as with other contractions, is not used in formal writing, though it may be used in dialogue.

Same with "gotta" and perhaps "alot".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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Professor Redwine:
+ "are not", "is not", "have not", "has not", "do not", "does not", "did not"
[nq:1]easier to say than "amn't", and without the grammatical error of "aren't I".[/nq]
But can we be sure? It could indeed be the "aren't" meaning that is being employed. Should we assume the best, or the worserest?
[nq:1]Webster's 3rd's usage note on "ain't" is interesting. In part, it reads: though disapproved by many and more common in ... parts of the U.S.. Some might have deemed this uncalled. Still, it's Merriam-Webster's judgement, and that's not to be sniffed.[/nq]
I seem have run prepositions too.
[nq:1]Time to get outta here! (I wonder why a second "t" was added.)[/nq]
Now that is an interesting wonder! May I join you?

Redwine
Hamburg
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Evan Kirshenbaum:
[nq:2]Let's hear it for "ain't"! It's a convenient contraction for "am not",[/nq]
[nq:1]+ "are not", "is not", "have not", "has not", "do not", "does not", "did not"[/nq]
"Do not", "does not", and "did not"? I can't think of any such uses in any dialect I'm familiar with. There's "I ain't got it" and there's also "I don't got it", but those don't seem to mean the same thing. ("I ain't got it" is simple lack of possession, while "I don't got it" is an admission that an earlier "I got it" claim of capability was incorrect.)

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >On a scale of one to ten...
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >it sucked.Palo Alto, CA 94304
(650)857-7572
http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
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Professor Redwine:
[nq:1]"Do not", "does not", and "did not"? I can't think of any such uses in any dialect I'm familiar with. ... possession, while "I don't got it" is an admission that an earlier "I got it" claim of capability was incorrect.)[/nq]
I was surprised by the "do" varieties too, but when double-checking the others at M-W online (http://tinyurl.com/ywne7 ) I saw them described as "used in some varieties of Black English".

Redwine
Hamburg
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Areff:
[nq:1]I was surprised by the "do" varieties too, but when double-checking the others at M-W online ( ) I saw them described as "used in some varieties of Black English".[/nq]
Now you've gone and wook up Steve "Purple" Hayes.
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