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My local English books say verb has three forms, such as go, went, and gone, where

go is 1st form.

went is 2nd form.

gone is 3rd form.

But on internet these forms have different names. Some webpages say these three forms are simple present, simple past, and past participle. While others say these forms are infinitive, simple past, and past participle.

How many different names these forms of verb have?
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"I/you/we/they go" is a (simple) present (tense) form
"to go" is the infinitive form

Thus "go" by itself could be seen as both infinitive and present.

Sometimes, people simplify things in their presentations.
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The most common form is Simple Present, Simple Past and Past Participle. We should be concerned about how to use the verbs correctly rather than the different names they are called.
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Hi Jackson

Many scholars also call the second form preterit[ e]. This may be because it doesn't always indicate past action: It's time we went out!

CB
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Cool BreezeHi Jackson

Many scholars also call the second form preterit[ e]. This may be because it doesn't always indicate past action: It's time we went out!

CB
Hi CB

It's time we went out. (I know 'went' should be used.)

But what is the reason for using 'went?
Yoong LiatIt's time we went out. (I know 'went' should be used.)

But what is the reason for using 'went?

I know of no other reason than the preterite having been idiomatic in that context for a long time. These are synonymous:

It's time for you to say something.
It's time you said something.


This use of the preterite has been discussed recently in another thread - I forget which one - and I have learned that some Americans say: It's time you say something.

CB
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Thanks, CJ.
Question 1:

I see Yoong Liat has written:
We should be concerned about how to use the verbs correctly rather than the different names they are called.

Would it be okay if I write the above sentence as:
We should be concerned about how to use the verbs correctly rather than the different names they are called by?


Question 2:

CB has written:
Many scholars also call the second form preterit[ e]. This may be because it doesn't always indicate past action: It's time we went out!

Preterite means bygone or former. This means preterite is synonym of past. I don't understand the part where CB said:
This may be because it doesn't always.... It's same as saying, This may be because it (preterite=past) doesn't always indicate past action, which is wrong because it is contradictory to itself. Then, why did CB said that?


Question 3:

CB wrote:

I know of no other reason than the preterite having been idiomatic in that context for a long time. These are synonymous:

It's time for you to say something.
It's time you said something.


This use of the preterite has been discussed recently in another thread - I forget which one - and I have learned that some Americans say:
It's time you say something.

1: Would it okay if I say: I know of no other reason except that the preterite...?


The form having with a past participle can be used to introduce a clause in which you mention an action which had already happened before another action began. e.g. He arrived in San Francisco, having left New Jersey on January 19th...
[Collins COBUILD Dictionary]

CB said: I know of no other reason than the preterite having been idiomatic in that context for a long time.

2: How does the above sentence fit in the context of the above definition?

CB said: I forget which one.

3: Why didn't she say, I forgot which one?
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Jackson6612Question 1:

I see Yoong Liat has written:
We should be concerned about how to use the verbs correctly rather than the different names they are called.

Would it be okay if I write the above sentence as:
We should be concerned about how to use the verbs correctly rather than the different names they are called by?
I agree. My name is Hoa Thai. You can call me by my firstname or my lastname (calling by different names)


Question 2:

CB has written:
Many scholars also call the second form preterit[ e]. This may be because it doesn't always indicate past action: It's time we went out!

Preterite means bygone or former. This means preterite is synonym of past. I don't understand the part where CB said:
This may be because it doesn't always.... It's same as saying, This may be because it (preterite=past) doesn't always indicate past action, which is wrong because it is contradictory to itself. Then, why did CB said that?
Because it is an unreal past. In this case, the peterite (a.k.a another beautiful name for pastas you said) is used to convey a wish for things to happen. For example: You see two friends arguing (present tense). You wish to break up the heated argument,so you say to one of them, "It's time we went." With that statement, you mean, "It's time we went." This 'I wish we went' is the same as 'I wish I won a lottery'. You express a wish for an event to happen in the future and you are in the present. Nobody can tell what will happen in the future as you would not know if your friend will go with you, or you will win a lottery. Therefore, past tense is used. (unreal past). Make sense?Emotion: smile


Question 3:

CB wrote:

I know of no other reason than the preterite having been idiomatic in that context for a long time. These are synonymous:

It's time for you to say something.
It's time you said something.


This use of the preterite has been discussed recently in another thread - I forget which one - and I have learned that some Americans say:
It's time you say something.

1: Would it okay if I say: I know of no other reason except that the preterite...? Yes.


The form having with a past participle can be used to introduce a clause in which you mention an action which had already happened before another action began. e.g. He arrived in San Francisco, having left New Jersey on January 19th...
[Collins COBUILD Dictionary]

CB said: I know of no other reason than the preterite having been idiomatic in that context for a long time.

2: How does the above sentence fit in the context of the above definition? Please review my explanation above.

CB said: I forget which one.

3: Why didn't she he say, I forgot which one? He now forgets which one.
Hi Jackson,

My comments are in pink.
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