How would you say this? A teacher is sending a test to another teacher for the latter to use any parts of the test she likes. Would you say "at your convenience" or "to your convenience"?

"Here goes the test. Feel free to use it to your convenience."

Thanks a lot!

Mara.
Full Member169
I am not quite sure what you mean with this sentence. But if you say - Feel free to use it at your convenience - it expresses that the receiver of the test may feel free to use it at a time or a place which is suitable for this person (the receiver)

BTW I am not so sure that I would formulate the sentence as you have done, but I cannot come up with a better solution myself.. Regards Jay
Full Member120
Hi,

How would you say this? A teacher is sending a test to another teacher for the latter to use any parts of the test she likes. Would you say "at your convenience" or "to your convenience"?

"Here goes the test. Feel free to use it to your convenience."

If I had to say it this way, and could only change the preposition, I'd use 'for'. But I'd prefer to reword the sentence to something like

"Feel free to use it in any way you wish."


"Here goes the test' is not correct. Just say 'Here is the test'.

Best wishes, Clive
Veteran Member67,726
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Hi Clive!

Why isn't "goes" correct in this context? The test is being sent by email, not handed in.

Thanks a lot!

Mara.
Hi,

Why isn't "goes" correct in this context? The test is being sent by email, not handed in.

'Here goes' is an idiomatic phrase that can be used to say, informally and a bit emphatically, 'I'm starting to do something now'.

eg Tom says 'Here goes', then jumps out of an airplane.

"here goes" + object could be said, but would need a more uncommon context.

If you really want to say to me 'I'm sending you the test now', say 'Here comes the test'. ie when I, as the reader, read this, the test is 'coming' to me.

Clive
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Hi again, Clive and sorry for being so inquisitive! Now, what if I change "here" for "there" and say "there goes the test"?

Another question: I've also been given these other suggestions. What do you think of them?:

Here’s the test. Feel free to use it however you see fit.

Here’s the test. Feel free to use it however suits you.

Here’s the test. Feel free to use it however you like.

Here’s the test. Feel free to use as much or as little as you like / wish.

(The idea is that the teacher may use whatever parts he/she wants.)

Thanks again!

Mara.
Hi,

what if I change "here" for "there" and say "there goes the test"?

This sounds like something you say as a 'detached observer', in the sense that the test is going and you aren't. The test is 'leaving you', and also 'leaving' the person you are speaking to.

eg You write an email, including the test. Your friend is in the room watching you. You press 'send' and say to your friend, 'There goes the test'.

eg The factory where you work burns to the ground. You watch this, and say to your friend beside you, 'There goes my job'.

I've also been given these other suggestions. What do you think of them?:

Here’s the test. Feel free to use it however you see fit.

Here’s the test. Feel free to use it however suits you.

Here’s the test. Feel free to use it however you like.

Here’s the test. Feel free to use as much or as little as you like / wish.





(The idea is that the teacher may use whatever parts he/she wants.)

These all sound fine to me.

Clive
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Anonymous:
You shall use "at your convenience".

Sincerely,
R. Strauss
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