Which is the correct saying? why?

If they are both correct, what is the difference in meaning?

a) I'm glad to have received your email.

b) I'm glad to receive your email.

Thanks!
Full Member469
Anonymous:
I don't think b) is wrong, but it sounds a little odd. a) is better.
miyabia) I'm glad to have received your email.
You have already gotten the email and are politely acknowledging that fact.
miyabib) I'm glad to receive your email.
This would imply that you have not yet received the email but are anticipating it. I don't think you are likely to hear anyone actually say this to someone.

You might, however, hear something like: "I'll be looking forward to [getting] your email." or "I'll be anticipating your email." In a situation where you have communicated with someone and have arranged for them to send an email on a specific topic or containing specific information.
Contributing Member1,732
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You should use sentence b.

"Recieve mail" is a past action which has a present result or significance: I'm glad because of that. That's why you should use Present Perfect.
Full Member253
RayH
miyabia) I'm glad to have received your email.
You have already gotten the email and are politely acknowledging that fact.
miyabib) I'm glad to receive your email.
This would imply that you have not yet received the email but are anticipating it. I don't think you are likely to hear anyone actually say this to someone.

Hi, Rayh,

But if the sentence was "I'm glas to receive your emails", then you'd understand 'I'm glad to keep receiving emails from you". Right?
tarirotariBut if the sentence was "I'm glad to receive your emails", then you'd understand 'I'm glad to keep receiving emails from you". Right?
I would understand it but it comes across as awkward and unnatural. In the situation you describe it would be better to say something like: "I always look forward to your emails."

It still sounds kind of awkward. Possibly because it's just not something that is often stated.
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
Yes, RayH, I understand,

but imagine that someone who usually emails you whatever the reason said: "Hey, do you mind if I keep emailing you?" and then you answered "Not at all. I'm glad to receive your emails."

Would the sentence still sound weird in this context?

Sorry to keep insisting on the matter, but I'm curious.
tarirotaribut imagine that someone who usually emails you whatever the reason said: "Hey, do you mind if I keep emailing you?" and then you answered "Not at all. I'm glad to receive your emails."
Given the added context I have no further objections.

Just as an aside, this whole thread emphasizes a couple of important points.
1) It emphasizes the importance of providing as much context as possible when asking questions. We could have avoided about 75 percent of this thread if the full context of the question had been provided in the original post.

2) It reveals that an unacceptable stand alone sentence can become acceptable when it is placed in its proper context.
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