RE: To Whom it May Concern? page 3

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CliveHi Goodman,

It sounds like you are learning the international-style tango, or evn perhaps what is called the American tango.

I'm involved with the Argentine tango form, which is more fluid, not jerky at all, very expressive. My advice is to go to a place where they dance Argentine tango and have a look. After that, if you are interested , find a good teacher and have a few lessons to try it. Many of the large cities in N. America have an 'Argentine tango sub-culture', which you can usually find by searching the 'net'.

If you get involved, keep me posted, OK?

Clive

Thanks Clive for your reply. I realize this forum is not about ballroom dance and I really should not make a lengthy topic out of it. I Promise I will make it as short as possible. My questions revolving Tango are really the confusion between the different styles of Tango. I had 3 different teachers and each taught different forms, steps and techniques which made it hard to remember and practice. There are clubs and communities within 30 miles of where I live that offer weekly dance. We simply pay the admission use the floor space for practice and mingle among the dancer. Each night a different dance lesson is offered. Is that what you meant by “sub-culture”? Is that true that if one can’t master the international style, he probably can’t do the Argentine because of the expressive style? Is there a rhythm count with the Argentine variety like the American style which has a basic 5 count and the 3 and 4 count variations? Thanks in advance! Emotion: smile
Senior Member3,816
Hi,

Thanks Clive for your reply. I realize this forum is not about ballroom dance and I really should not make a lengthy topic out of it. Don't worry about it.As you know, we've had much lengthier topics on less interesting things.Emotion: smile

I Promise I will make it as short as possible. My questions revolving Tango are really the confusion between the different styles of Tango. I had 3 different teachers and each taught different forms, steps and techniques which made it hard to remember and practice. There are clubs and communities within 30 miles of where I live that offer weekly dance. We simply pay the admission use the floor space for practice and mingle among the dancer. Each night a different dance lesson is offered. Is that what you meant by “sub-culture”? Yes. Does the dancing look to you the same as ballroom dancing. If it does, you are going to the wrong place!

Is that true that if one can’t master the international style, he probably can’t do the Argentine because of the expressive style? No, not at all. In fact, ballroom dancers have to 'unlearn' a lot of habits in oderer to learn how to do the Argentine tango. I know a lot of ballroom dancers who enjoy the tango because it is so completely different. Even the basic embrace itself is totally different.

Is there a rhythm count with the Argentine variety like the American style which has a basic 5 count and the 3 and 4 count variations? No, it's a steady beat.

What you need, I think, is a good teacher, who starts with the basics, including posture, embrace, connection with your partner and musicality.

Clive
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Too bad you live too far from San Jose, Calif.....Emotion: smile

Thanks for the advice!
Hope I am not interrupting!

Clive, you said that "To whom it may concern" shouldn't be used in all type of letters, did you mean all the formal letters? Then, in which type of letters should we use it?
I think I've read well and you didn't mention anything about it...Emotion: rolleyes

Thanks in advance!
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Hi,

The only time I'd consider using it would be if I were writing an employment or character reference for someone, and the person was just going to give it to any employer in the future who asked for it. And even in this kind of case, I find that such reference letters don't seem to be used much any more. Applicants usually just give the employer the name and contact info for the person who is their reference. That's because people were just writing reference letters for themselves, ie forging them.

I can't think off-hand of another kind of letter I'd write this phrase in. Do you have any kinds of letters in mind?

Clive
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Hello Clive!:)

I don't write letters to companies, you know. I write them as essays and, in formal letters I have always started with "Dear Sir/Madam," or "Dear Mr ___,". I only learnt how to write letters of complaint, asking for some kind of information or for employment, I suppose I will learn how to write other type of formal letters this year.

Would "To whom it may concern" be used as "Dear ____,"? If so, should it be something like this?

To whom it may concern,

I'm writing in reference to....

Yours faithfully,
_______

You mentioned the employment thing, could I use it in my essays if I'm writing a letter for employment and I don't know what the name of owner is? So, instead of "Dear Sir/Madam", this sentence.

Thanks again!
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Hi,

No. What I'm trying to say is just forget about 'To whom it may concern'. Don't use it at all.

Best wishes, Clive
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Okies - Thanks Clive!:)
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Anonymous:
According to grammatical rules, all words in a salutation (greeting) should be capitalized similarly to capitalization in titles (all words except short prepositions, articles, and conjuctions). Therefore, the correct capitalization for this phrase is "To Whom It May Concern."
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