Twice as...as / half as...as?

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Do these sentences mean the same? If they both have the same meaning which of them sounds better?

1. This car is twice as cheaper as that car.
2. This car is half as expensive as that car.

1. Our house is twice as small as their house.
2. Our house is half as big as their house.

Thank you in advance.
Full Member307
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Half is used with nouns which are measurable quantities that can be divided equally. Here is an example of half + adjective.

The optimist sees a glass as half full. The pessimist sees the same glass as half empty.

1. I have half as much money as he has him.

2. I have twice as little money as him. >> This does not make sense. say instead: I have twice as much money as he has.
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Alex+1. This car is twice as cheaper as that car.>> Incorrect. Use "cheap," not "cheaper."
2. This car is half as expensive as that car. >> OK.

Usually I would say "This car costs twice as much as that one." or "This car is half the price of that one." Cheap has the connotation of being poorly constucted, not just less expensive.

1. Our house is twice as small as their house.
2. Our house is half as big as their house. This one sounds better. But I would say "Our house is half the size of theirs."

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Thank you very much for your answer.

In all your examples “half” is used with nouns.

"This car is half the price of that one."
"Our house is half the size of theirs."

Can give me some good examples where “half” would be use with adjectives?

And what can you say about these sentences?

1. I have half as much money as him.
2. I have twice as little money as him.
I’d be very obliged to you if you could explain me one more thing.

Q #1: Can I use “twice” if I want to say than one thing is smaller (shorter, lower, worse …) by half than the other one? Or I must use only “half”?

1. This house is twice as lower as that house.
2. This road is twice as short as that road.

If these sentences are incorrect could you correct them?
I have half as much money as he has him.

Q#2: You corrected “him” and put “he has”. Does it mean than “him” can’t be used in that sentence?
2. I have twice as little money as him. >> This does not make sense. say instead: I have twice as much money as he has.

Probably you wanted to say: “I have half as much money as he has.” ?
Alex+Probably you wanted to say: “I have half as much money as he has.” ?
No, the problem was in the original sentence which was not understandable. "twice" always means doubling in size, an increased quantity.
"Half" always means 50 percent, a decreased amount.

"Twice as little" makes no sense - you have to say "twice as much" or "half as much".
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Alex+1. This house is twice as lower as that house.
2. This road is twice as short as that road.
1) You cannot use the comparative form in the construction "twice as, half as". You can say:
This house is lower than that house.
This house is half the height of that house.
This house is 50 percent lower than that house.

2) "Twice as short" does not make any sense. Twice means "more, larger". Short is not going in an increasing direction, it is going in the opposite direction. Also, we do not measure how short something is. We do measure how long something is - its length. You cannot use "short" in these constuctions.

This road is half as long as that road.
This road is twice as long as that road.
Alex+Q#2: You corrected “him” and put “he has”. Does it mean than “him” can’t be used in that sentence?
"Him" is object case. Under strict grammar rules, there are 2 subjects.

I (subject) have half as much as he (subject) has.

In modern usage, this rule has been relaxing. You will frequently hear the object case (him / her / them) used.
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AlpheccaStars, thank you for your answer.

As I understood structures with “twice” always mean “more”. Can I used “three (four, five..) times” in phrases that mean “less / fewer”

Example #1:
Road A is 300 km and road B is 100 km, therefore:

Road A is three times longer than road B. = Road A is thee times as long as road B.

Can I say: “Road B is three times shorter than road A.” or “Road B is three times as short as road A.“

Example #2 :
Jack has 10 apples and Ann has 2 apples, therefore:

Jack has five times more apples than Ann. = Jack has five times as many apples as Ann.

Can I say: “Ann has five times fewer apples as Jack.” or “Ann has five times as few apples as Jack.”
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