Unfunny latin motto.

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Alan OBrien:
People who have a very very weak sense of humour will sometimes quote the pseado-Latin motto which is suppose dto translate as 'don't let the bastards grind you down'.
Just this moment I saw it as "nil illegitimum carborundum". So I put that exact phrase into Google (94 hits).
Google suggested ""nil illegitimus carborundum" (150 hits). "Non illegitimus carborundum" gives 353 hits.
Are there any other variations?
I suspect that the motto is being used today by people who have no idea what carborundum is used for. Many may actually believe that it is genuine Latin.

Alan

Work like the ponies in coalmines.
Dance like the teardrop explodes.
Love like you're Frank in Blue Velvet.
Sing as though your little throat would burst.
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John Flynn:
[nq:1]People who have a very very weak sense of humour will sometimes quote the pseado-Latin motto which is suppose dto ... by people who have no idea what carborundum is used for. Many may actually believe that it is genuine Latin.[/nq]
"non illegitimi carborundum" gives just over 3,000 results.

"illegitmi" being the plural of "illegitimus" which equates to not letting the (plural) bastards grind you down, rather than merely stopping one of them from doing all the work on his own.
Also: "pseado"?

johnF
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John Flynn:
[nq:1]"illegitmi" being the plural of "illegitimus"[/nq]
Yeah, yeah, typo, I know, before anyone leaps on me and points out such atrocious Latin.
How is it that typos in English will go by with a tacit acceptance, but a typo in a foreign (or pseado-foreign!) language will be pounced on by ravenous masses?

johnF
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John Dean:
[nq:1]People who have a very very weak sense of humour will sometimes quote the pseado-Latin motto which is suppose dto ... (94 hits). Google suggested ""nil illegitimus carborundum" (150 hits). "Non illegitimus carborundum" gives 353 hits. Are there any other variations?[/nq]
I first saw "nil illegitimati carborundum"

John 'but then I went to a good school' Dean
Oxford
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Tony Cooper:
[nq:2]"illegitmi" being the plural of "illegitimus"[/nq]
[nq:1]Yeah, yeah, typo, I know, before anyone leaps on me and points out such atrocious Latin. How is it that ... with a tacit acceptance, but a typo in a foreign (or pseado-foreign!) language will be pounced on by ravenous masses?[/nq]
The ravenous want to dine on your errors.
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Daniel James:
[nq:1]... the pseado-Latin motto which is suppose dto translate as 'don't let the bastards grind you down'.[/nq]
It has to be "non" (not) rather that "nil" (nothing) - though I've seen it with "nunquam" or "numquam" (never).
Bastards are plural, so "illegitimi" rather than "illegitimus" - though I've seen "illegitimati" and "illegitimes"; which are plural forms but not the right ones.
Carborundum is pretty much a given as it stands (silicon carbide, a very hard substance used in the manufacture of cutting tools and abrasives - hence: /grind/ you down).
So, on balance, "non illegitimi carborundum" is what you're looking for, but "non illegitimi carbidum silicii" seems more nicely classical.
Alternative formulae such as "nothibus non licet opprimere" just don't cut it, somehow.
Cheers,
Daniel.
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Alan OBrien:
[nq:1]Also: "pseado"?[/nq]
When I see spelling errors I normally have a look at my own keyboard and I allow a one-character distance (laterally, normally). This one is well beyond my personal limit and I can only say that I have no idea how it came about!
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CB:
[nq:2]... the pseado-Latin motto which is suppose dto translate as 'don't let the bastards grind you down'.[/nq]
[nq:1]It has to be "non" (not) rather that "nil" (nothing) - though I've seen it with "nunquam" or "numquam" (never). ... silicii" seems more nicely classical. Alternative formulae such as "nothibus non licet opprimere" just don't cut it, somehow. Cheers, Daniel.[/nq]
A nothis opprimi non oportet? CB
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Odysseus:
[nq:1]People who have a very very weak sense of humour will sometimes quote the pseado-Latin motto which is suppose dto ... (94 hits). Google suggested ""nil illegitimus carborundum" (150 hits). "Non illegitimus carborundum" gives 353 hits. Are there any other variations?[/nq]
I've encountered quite a few, but the first one I heard, "Illegitimi non carborundum," is also the highest-scoring of those I tried, with
4680 hits. My mate reports that the only form she's noticed is "Nonillegitimus carborundum."
For a few obvious variations, "Illegitimus non carborundum" gets 4640 hits, "Nil illegitimi carborundum" 277, and "Non illegitimi carborundum" 3300.

Odysseus
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