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Anonymous:
Is this correct: I would like to travel to Boston, MA, and while I'm there visit my family.

Is it correct to put another comma after the city abreviation?
Which abbreviation?
I see the name of the city (Boston) in full here.

And yes, a comma is correct in:
Boston, MA
Also, it is correct after MA, the abbreviation of the state.
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Hi,

Is this correct: I would like to travel to Boston, MA, and while I'm there visit my family.

Is it correct to put another comma after the city abbreviation? In examples like this, commas before and after the MA are often omitted. Really, they should both be there. In fact, I'd say that, for good writing, you should say 'Maine' in full rather than the postal abbreviation.

In addition, you should put commas before and after the phrase 'while I'm there'. If you want to avoid so many commas, you could move the phrase to after the word 'family'. It reads better that way.

I would like to travel to Boston, MA, and visit my family while I'm there.

Best wishes, Clive
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Anonymous:
Boston is in Massachusetts, but you have the commas in the right place Emotion: smile
Emotion: smile Yes, MA is Massachusetts and ME is Maine. Many style guides have a list of cities that don't require the state because it's so commonly understood which cities you mean. Boston is one of them. (Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Detroit, etc. - the major cities in the U.S.)
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Anonymous:
Is this correct:  I would like to travel to Miami, Fla., and while I'm there visit my family.
Hi,

Is this correct: I would like to travel to Miami, Fla., and while I'm there visit my family.

It's OK to put a period after this abbreviation, but why not just write it like this?

I would like to travel to Miami, Florida, and while I'm there visit my family.

Best wishes, Clive

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Many style guides have a list of cities that don't require the state because it's so commonly understood which cities you mean. Boston is one of them.

Apparently it's not so commonly undertood in Canada!Emotion: wink
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Anonymous:
I guess this is for everybody, but what I'd like to know is WHY a comma has to be after the state, when you have Chicago, Illinois, in the middle of a sentence (such as this one).

It only seems to set it off as a city/state combo so that nobody gets confused that "Chicago" is kicking off some sort of goofy list. Basically, it seems like a rule suited to those who have a very bad grasp of geography....

Thoughts?
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