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Is there any difference between 'warranty' and 'guarantee'?
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Use only warranty on products you buy etc.

see
warranty and guarantee
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Marius HancuUse only warranty on products you buy etc.

see
warranty and guarantee
Right! They are obviously of the same origin, but warranty is used for products (usually for a certain amount of time). However, I "guarantee" that you will like this if you try it. There may be regional differences as well.
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Regional differences, yes! On British products you find a guarantee, on American products a warranty (actually none of them are British or American, it depends on who writes the information sheet!).
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From AskOxford.com

warranty

• noun: (pl. warranties) 1 a written guarantee promising to repair or replace an article if necessary within a specified period.

guarantee

• noun: 1 a formal assurance that certain conditions will be fulfilled, especially that a product will be of a specified quality.

Actually the error here is that most native speakers use them interchangeably and it has nothing to do with British, American or any other type of English.

'Warranty' has a time limit, e.g. for 12 months... and may be extendable to 24, 36 or 48 months for example.

'Guarantee' is to a standard of quality and is not time bound... and is non-extendable.

However, we are all familiar with 'Lifetime Guarantee' claims by manufacturers... which of course are non-extendable by their very definition...

Hope that helps...
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Anonymous:
nice answer Emotion: smile
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Anonymous:
One of the best angles from which tackle this clarification problem.
Thanks.
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'Guarantee' is to a standard of quality and is not time bound... and is non-extendable.

We often find this sentence when we buy something, for example, a watch.

The guarantee states as follows:

This watch is guaranteed against manufacturing defects for a period of one year from the date of purchase.

Does it mean that 'guaranteed' has been wrongly used?
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Anonymous:
tks
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