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as titled, please help.
Regular Member934
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I would use well known.
New Member36
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Please use well-known.
Contributing Member1,408
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It is a well-known fact that he is well known.

Both can be used, but a hyphen is required when the phrase is adjectival.
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Feebs11It is a well-known fact that he is well known.

Both can be used, but a hyphen is required when the phrase is adjectival.
That's how I learned it.

Next question: does it apply to other adv/adj combinations? [His desk is poorly organized ~ His poorly-organized desk is preventing his getting work done.]

I recently had this conversation with a friend, and she insists that the hyphen is used only with "well". Ideas, Feebs? Anyone?
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PhilipNext question: does it apply to other adv/adj combinations? [His desk is poorly organized ~ His poorly-organized desk is preventing his getting work done.]

I recently had this conversation with a friend, and she insists that the hyphen is used only with "well". Ideas, Feebs? Anyone?
I agree with you friend, Philip. Well-known / well known may not be the only such combination but I certainly wouldn't hyphenate a cleverly written report, for example.

CB
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What a great example!

Thank you.
Full Member205
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Philip
Feebs11It is a well-known fact that he is well known.

Both can be used, but a hyphen is required when the phrase is adjectival.
That's how I learned it.
Next question: does it apply to other adv/adj combinations? [His desk is poorly organized ~ His poorly-organized desk is preventing his getting work done.]

I recently had this conversation with a friend, and she insists that the hyphen is used only with "well". Ideas, Feebs? Anyone?
My training is that you hyphenate the adjectival phrases, but not the adverbial ones. So "poorly organized" would not be hyphenated, but "clean-cut" would be. It is not an absolute rule so far as I can determine. Some people prefer to hyphenate, others don't. I prefer it if it clarifies a sentence.
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
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Feebs11
Philip
Feebs11It is a well-known fact that he is well known.

Both can be used, but a hyphen is required when the phrase is adjectival.
That's how I learned it.

Next question: does it apply to other adv/adj combinations? [His desk is poorly organized ~ His poorly-organized desk is preventing his getting work done.]

I recently had this conversation with a friend, and she insists that the hyphen is used only with "well". Ideas, Feebs? Anyone?
My training is that you hyphenate the adjectival phrases, but not the adverbial ones. So "poorly organized" would not be hyphenated, but "clean-cut" would be. It is not an absolute rule so far as I can determine. Some people prefer to hyphenate, others don't. I prefer it if it clarifies a sentence.
That should always be the bottom line!
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