What does A-level mean?

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Michael Westphal:
Hello folks,
what is A-level ?
What kind of education is that?
Studying at university or the school to get prepared for a university study (in Germany called "Abitur")?
Many thanks for your help!
Michael
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Dónal:
A level = Advanced Level. You usually take it when you are 17/18 and Universities judge you by them.
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Mark Brader:
Michael Westphal:
[nq:1]what is A-level ?[/nq]
NEWTs for muggles.

Mark Brader, Toronto "Well, I'm back", he said. (Email Removed) Tolkien (The Lord of the Rings)
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Harvey Van Sickle:
[nq:1]Hello folks, what is A-level ? What kind of education is that? Studying at university or the school to get prepared for a university study (in Germany called "Abitur")?[/nq]
These are qualifying rather than preparatory studies that is, A levels are a qualification which are used to gain entrance to a university.
I think the "A" stands for "Advanced" (as opposed to "O" levels, which were "Ordinary", and which were not university entrance qualifications).

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
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Volker Gringmuth:
[nq:1]what is A-level ?[/nq]
AFAIK, it means "Advanced".
[nq:1]What kind of education is that? Studying at university or the school to get prepared for a university study (in Germany called "Abitur")?[/nq]
The latter.
vG

~~~~~~ Volker Gringmuth ~~~~~~~~~~~ http://einklich.net / ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"Du kannst aufhören zu posten. Ich war wohl gerade der letzte, der Dich gelesen hat." (Holger Prinke in dciwam)
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david56:
[nq:1]Hello folks, what is A-level ? What kind of education is that? Studying at university or the school to get prepared for a university study (in Germany called "Abitur")?[/nq]
To add to the previous replies, 18 year olds in the UK who wish to carry on to university usually take three, four or five different subjects at A-levels (each consisting of two or three exams and possibly coursework in addition) in May and June. The results were released last Thursday. Universities admit students based on their A-level grades, making offers during the previous school year.

To crow for a moment, Daughter has achieved the AAB required to get her into her first choice, so she's off to Warwick University to study for an MEng.
BTW, Warwick University is nowhere near Warwick, but is actually on on the edge of Coventry.

David
I say what it occurs to me to say.
==
The address is valid today, but I change it periodically.
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=?ISO-8859-1?Q?Per_R=F8nne?=:
[nq:1]A level = Advanced Level.[/nq]
And S-level?

Per Erik Rønne
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Don Phillipson:
[nq:1]what is A-level ?[/nq]
From about 1945 to some date in the 1980s
British students underwent national examinations
for the GCE = General Certificate of Education
at three levels:
O = Ordinary, at approx. age 15
A = Advanced, two years later
S = Scholarship, one year after A
GCE O level was nominally required for university
admission and certain types of employment. O
level examinations were written in a large variety of subjects. Clever children commonly wrote 8 or

10 different examinations, less clever childrenfewer.
GCE A level was written in only two or three
subjects because most British children specialized at school (dropping either classics or science
after O level to pursue only the oother). A levels were an important criterion for admission to the
Oxford and Cambridge, which had many more
applicants than they could admit.
S level examinations were no less important
for university study, because they guided the
allotment of fee grants by county councils.
In the postwar decades British universities
charged fees which few students could afford:
so nearly all undergraduates went to
university with S-level grants from the counties
where they lived or went to school, as well
as earlier A and O-level credentials.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
dphillipson(at)trytel.com
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Don Phillipson:
[nq:1]BTW, Warwick University is nowhere near Warwick, but is actually on on the edge of Coventry.[/nq]
Coventry and Warwick are 10 or 12 miles
apart. The university is more or less in the middle of the county of Warwickshire (before reorganization of county boundaries about 20 years ago.)

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
dphillipson(at)trytel.com
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