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In slang if you say anything ish you mean a "little bit of"?
New Member18
Hi Jessica

"ish" certainly can mean "a little bit".
For instance:
A: "Are you warm yet?"
B: "I'm warmish."

It's also a way of indicating that you are not being exact, but approximate.
Examples:
"I'll be there nineish" = I'll be there at about 9 o'clock.
"She is fortyish" = She's about forty years old.

"ish" has the advantage of being able to be tagged on to a sentence you have already uttered (i.e. without recasting the sentence to indicate that you're not being exact).
For instance:
"Well it's blue ... ish" = The speaker's first impression is that the colour is blue, but there is some doubt in his mind.

Cheers

John.
Full Member178
thanks john, very helpful indeed!
hottish!
Senior Member4,756
"ish" has been mentioned here as being used in slang. Slang isn't my strong point, but I have seen the ending "ish" used in formal texts, in the description of the colour of a substance, for example ("a greyish/whitish matter").

My question here is when is the ending "ish" to be considered slang? It appears in several adjectives, such as British, and it is not an instance of slang there.

Thanks,

Miriam
Regular Member826
Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.Teachers: Users in this role are certified teachers. This may include DELTA, CELTA, TESOL, TEFL qualified professionals. Email a scan of your qualification to an admin, if you wish to be considered.
well miriam, I'd say that is all about TIME - the -ish morpheme is well established in the way of slightly modifying an adjective

if you read a phrase like "thickish mixture" in a recipe you accept it because that useage has been around a long time, and has become mainstream,

if you hear it tagged on in a novel way it could be classed as "slang" adnit will either be temporary or it will stick - some of yesteryear's slang is today's standard useageand some of it just sank without trace!
Full Member465
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
Hi to All...

First I would say that I have no any moral rights to discuss here with u such hard things, as I'm not expert in this language, Even not in intermediate level.  Yet, somehow my curiosity to talk with u  and share with my opinions doesn't let me to live the topic without saying anything.
For this reason please dont pay much attention to my mistakes and poor language. 

I think "ish" is used sometimes to make adjektives. For example: "I'm confused on his childish behavior!", also u can see for example: "british hospitality", "spanish olives" and so on. May be I was wrong with these sentences, but it seems to be that "ish" is used to make adjectives as I sad above.

I was wondering what did our experts like Miriam, Mr. Micawbere, Clive, Avangi, Alphecca Stars and others think about my opinion.  

Thank u for wasting your time reading the dumbest post u have ever seenEmotion: smile
peace
New Member34
Jessica

'ish' means 'sort of'

'Are you happy?'

'Happyish' may be an example.

Sam
New Member20
Anonymous:
There are very many ways this ish suffix is used in English. One of them is to make a new word with ties to some other word or words: standoffish. To stand off means to stand apart or at a distance. By adding ish you create a new word which retains the essence of the original: standoffish means tending to keep one's distance in relationships. Self means one's own entity. By adding ish to self you get a new, related word that means overly concerned with one's own entity. Other examples: childish, mannish, stylish, womanish.
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