What is the meaning of 'yearling'?

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Abhi:
Well, I recalled my childhood favorite novel details and found name of that long forgotten novel. It is 'The Yearling'.
But I don't understand meaning of this word.
Do you people know it?
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UC:
[nq:1]Well, I recalled my childhood favorite novel details and found name of that long forgotten novel. It is 'The Yearling'. But I don't understand meaning of this word. Do you people know it?[/nq]
An animal that is one year old.
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dontbother:
[nq:1]Well, I recalled my childhood favorite novel details and found name of that long forgotten novel. It is 'The Yearling'.[/nq]
It's a novel about a boy and his pet deer.
[nq:1]But I don't understand meaning of this word.[/nq]
It means something that's one year old.
[nq:1]Do you people know it?[/nq]
Don't you know how to use a search engine?

Franke: EFL teacher and medical editor
Unmunged email: /at/hush.ai
Native speaker of American English, posting from Taiwan It's all in the way you say it, innit?
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Alan:
Is that what they used to call a dictionary?
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Nick Spalding:
UC wrote, in (Email Removed) on 16 Jul 2006 10:45:08 -0700:
[nq:2]Well, I recalled my childhood favorite novel details and found ... understand meaning of this word. Do you people know it?[/nq]
[nq:1]An animal that is one year old.[/nq]
With the year defined for the particular usage. In the UK/Ireland a racehorse is a yearling from the first of January of the year following its birth even if that occurred on December 31st; is it the same in America?
Nick Spalding
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Alan:
[nq:2]An animal that is one year old.[/nq]
[nq:1]With the year defined for the particular usage. In the UK/Ireland a racehorse is a yearling from the first of January of the year following its birth even if that occurred on December 31st; is it the same in America? Nick Spalding[/nq]
Why don't we all just have a look at a dictionary? (or a "search engine" as some like to call it). MW would be ideal for North American usage: yearling: " one that is a year old: as a : an animal one year old or in the second year of its age b : a racehorse between January 1 of the year after the year in which it was foaled and the next January 1"
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Pat Durkin:
[nq:1]Well, I recalled my childhood favorite novel details and found name of that long forgotten novel. It is 'The Yearling'. But I don't understand meaning of this word. Do you people know it?[/nq]
The young deer referred to in
"The Yearling", as I picture it, was not really a yearling, in the sense that he had not completed his first year. But I am not sure of my recollection. Of course, a half-grown deer (or boy, as I think the book intends) lacks the necessary skills to survive, and must face loss and death. Was the fawn (per citation below) female or male?

"Jody gets his pet, a frisky fawn he calls Flag, but that's not all. With Flag comes a year of life lessons, frolicking times, and achingly hard decisions. This powerful book is as compelling now as when it was written over 60 years ago."
http://tinyurl.com/kroeg or
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0684184613/102-2612654-4198533?v=glance&n=283155

I think the indication is that Jody got the pet as a motherless fawn, and raised it to a yearling age, so "The Yearling" had become a yearling during the same year in which Jody learned a great deal.

"Spike bucks" are classified with antlerless deer (does) in hunting terms, meaning there are early tagged hunting seasons in which helping to cull an overpopulated deer herd is valued and rewarded with a license to hunt fully antlered bucks, or trophy deer.
http://www.pbase.com/lilwings/image/35381393 photo "Spikes are usually 1 1/2-year-old yearling bucks. However, in areas with too many deer for the available food base, some 2 1/2-year-old bucks will grow spike antlers. Antlers on older spike bucks are usually longer and larger in diameter than those grown by yearlings. " http://www.kentuckyawake.org/askexpert/answers.cfm?instanceID=6304

I enjoyed that novel as well as "The Red Pony", "Old Yeller" and "My Friend Flicka". Although I was fairly mature when I read them, I think that I gained an idea of how some "learning by experience" can be gained by reading.
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Weatherlawyer:
[nq:2]Well, I recalled my childhood favorite novel details and found ... understand meaning of this word. Do you people know it?[/nq]
[nq:1]The young deer referred to in "The Yearling", as I picture it, was not really a yearling, in the sense that he had not completed his first year. But I am not sure of my recollection.[/nq]
I believe the term refers to an horse anyway. I doubt there is a specific term for that age in deer and the like. In animal husbandry there are a variety of such terms for describing different types of domestic animals.
I imagine they were derived from a necessity brought on by biology and finance.
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John Dean:
[nq:2]An animal that is one year old.[/nq]
[nq:1]With the year defined for the particular usage. In the UK/Ireland a racehorse is a yearling from the first of January of the year following its birth even if that occurred on December 31st; is it the same in America?[/nq]
OED says "esp. a sheep, calf, or foal; also applied to certain birds and fishes; rarely to a child)."
What animals seem appropriate for the usage? (I'd go along with horses, cows, sheep and deer and probably a few others). Where is it not appropriate? I'd go with OED on "child". I find it hard to imagine the term used for a hamster, canary or grass snake.

John Dean
Oxford
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