What's the definition of "grasshopper"?

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AbbieNormal:
What does it mean when someone calls somebody grasshopper? Is the connotation positive/negative? Is this a Southern US term?

Thanks.
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R H Draney:
AbbieNormal filted:
[nq:1]What does it mean when someone calls somebody grasshopper? Is the connotation positive/negative? Is this a Southern US term?[/nq]
Calling someone "grasshopper" implies that he's young, inexperienced, and somewhat impulsive...it comes from the 1970s television show "Kung Fu" where David Carradine's character was called this by the Shaolin monks who trained him..r
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Arcadian Rises:
[nq:1]What does it mean when someone calls somebody grasshopper? Is the connotation positive/negative?[/nq]
It depends.
See Aesop and La fontaine's fable "The Ant and the Grasshopper".

The morale suggests that the lazy grasshopper is the bad guy, so the connotation of calling someone a grasshopper could be negative.

OTOH, the grasshopper is the free spirit, the artistic type while the anal ant spends her* life working to accumulate possessions.

* I use "her" in spirit of La Fontaine fable "La cigalle and la fourmi". Is this a Southern US term?
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Arcadian Rises:
Oops...
please disregard my previous message. I don't know how to delete it.
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Dena Jo:
[nq:1]What does it mean when someone calls somebody grasshopper? Is the connotation positive/negative? Is this a Southern US term?[/nq]
It means young student. I first heard it on a TV show back in the '70s, Kung Fu. I've no clue if the term is used in real life, but surely someone around here will know.

Dena Jo
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Xomicron:
[nq:1]What does it mean when someone calls somebody grasshopper? Is the connotation positive/negative? Is this a Southern US term?[/nq]
It comes from martial arts movies.
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Mark Brader:
[nq:2]What does it mean when someone calls somebody grasshopper? ...[/nq]
[nq:1]It means young student. I first heard it on a TV show back in the '70s, Kung Fu. I've no clue if the term is used in real life ...[/nq]
I wouldn't have made that connection; I would have taken the word as a simple metaphor. A grasshopper is an insect famous for its ability to jump; someone called a grasshopper could be someone who often "jumps" from one job or city or girlfriend to another rather than settling down. This is more likely to be a young person, I guess, but not necessarily a student.
Of course, more context would help. Since several people have mentioned the Kung Fu connection, it's quite possible that this, and not the metaphor I had in mind, is what the original speaker meant.
Mark Brader > "Don't you ever want to change your life? Toronto > "You talk about life as if it was something you buy (Email Removed) > in the shops: 'I'm sorry, but when I got it home,
[nq:1]it didn't suit me.'" Butterflies[/nq]
My text in this article is in the public domain.
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Skitt:
Mark Brader was the last to write (without any attributions):
[nq:2]It means young student. I first heard it on a ... clue if the term is used in real life ...[/nq]
[nq:1]I wouldn't have made that connection; I would have taken the word as a simple metaphor. A grasshopper is an ... rather than settling down. This is more likely to be a young person, I guess, but not necessarily a student.[/nq]
Isn't that a butterfly?
[nq:1]Of course, more context would help. Since several people have mentioned the Kung Fu connection, it's quite possible that this, and not the metaphor I had in mind, is what the original speaker meant.[/nq]
Yeah, I'll go with the Kung Fu connection.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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R J Valentine:
} Mark Brader was the last to write (without any attributions): }
}>>> What does it mean when someone calls somebody grasshopper? ... }>
}>> It means young student. I first heard it on a TV show back in the }>> '70s, Kung Fu. I've no clue if the term is used in real life ... ...
}> Of course, more context would help. Since several people have }> mentioned the Kung Fu connection, it's quite possible that this, and }> not the metaphor I had in mind, is what the original speaker meant. }
} Yeah, I'll go with the Kung Fu connection.
Oh, yeah. I have only to reach for my pebble dish and people start heading for the door.

R. J. Valentine
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