what't the difference between "Please be advised" & "please advise"?

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what't the difference between "Please be advised" & "please advise"?

which of the following is correct?

1. Please be advised that we have received your letter.

2. Please advise that we have received your letter.

thank you
New Member27
Approved answer (verified by )
Hi,

1. Please be advised that we have received your letter. This means 'We want to tell you that we have received it'. It's a standard business expression. Personally, I dislike this as it seems to serve no purpose usually. I'd omit it, and just say 'We have received your letter.

2. Please advise that we have received your letter. This is wrong. It makes no sense.

Best wishes, Clive
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You would use the expression 'please advise' if you are looking for someone to give you some advice or direction on how to move forward. For instance, if you write an email to your supervisor, explaining a difficulty you are having with a customer, you might end the letter by saying 'please advise" meaning please get back to me with your suggested answer.
Regular Member558
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I see.

thanks for your help.
Clive2. Please advise that we have received your letter. This is wrong. It makes no sense.

Best wishes, Clive

Hi! As I see it, 'advise' in the formal style takes on the meaning of 'inform', so in a slightly changed context it might mean 'Please inform (us) if/when you have received our letter.'
New Member23
Anonymous:
Hi, Clive. I cannot agree with you more. when i first began to work in this law firm after graduation, i saw this redundant expression everywhere in our files, and i tended to follow suit then. but now I handle countless papers in our law firm, but seldom use it any more. the reason is that it just adds nothing to my writing. I dont mean to tread on anyone's toe, but i really feel some people take it so often just because they actually don't have a good comand of english and try to take this as a make-up.

do sever yourself with "please be advised", everybody.

"please advise..." which is intended to mean "please tell/let me know..." is fine.
Hi,

Please advise that we have received your letter.

I dislike the formulaic aspect of this phrase. However, when I said This is wrong... It makes no sense... here is what I particularly had in mind. I think the writer meant to say this:

Please advise that you have received our letter.

After all, how can you advise that we have received a letter, how would you know that? As I said, it makes no sense.

Best wishes, Clive
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Anonymous:
The correct is "Please be advised that we have received your letter".

When you say "Please be advised" you are actually informing some thing.

"Please advise" would be used to require some information/advice. Ex. Dear... We have not received your letter as yet and we need to know how to proceed in this case. Please advise."

I hope I've helped a little. Emotion: surprise)
Please be advised that X means I am telling you someting.

Please advise X about Y means I am asking you to tell someone else something.
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