RE: Why are you learning English? page 3

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Hi Inchoateknowledge,

You wrote:
I do not study any dialects, only the standard language.
Which standard?

Englishuser
Regular Member717
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Anonymous:
Hi

The one I often hear being referred to as BBC English.

I have spoken about it with some people who have been raised in an English-speaking country: South-Africa, USA, England, Scotland, Philippines, from the four corners of the world; and they were all of the opinion that what we hear on BBC is the language most widely understood and used.

Do Ivy-league graduates, professors speak different dialects irrespective of where they were raised?

Do graduates who came down from Oxford and speak with a plum in their mouth speak a different dialect from that their Ivy-league counterparts do?
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Hi

The one I often hear being referred to as BBC English.

I have spoken about it with some people who have been raised in an English-speaking country: South-Africa, USA, England, Scotland, Philippines, from the four corners of the world; and they were all of the opinion that what we hear on BBC is the language most widely understood and used.

Do Ivy-league graduates, professors speak different dialects irrespective of where they were raised?

Do graduates who came down from Oxford and speak with a plum in their mouth speak a different dialect from that their Ivy-league counterparts do?
Senior Member2,552
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InchoateknowledgeHi

Do you mean if I study various varieties of Englishes?

Yes, I meant that.

I do not study any dialects, only the standard language. This is "the common denominator".

What does "common denominator" mean in this context? Which standard variant are you studying?
Senior Member3,149
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<Do Ivy-league graduates, professors speak different dialects irrespective of where they were raised?

Do graduates who came down from Oxford and speak with a plum in their mouth speak a different dialect from that their Ivy-league counterparts do?>

Do you wish only to speak with such people?
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InchoateknowledgeThe one I often hear being referred to as BBC English.

I have spoken about it with some people who have been raised in an English-speaking country: South-Africa, USA, England, Scotland, Philippines, from the four corners of the world; and they were all of the opinion that what we hear on BBC is the language most widely understood and used.

Can those people, including you, please tell us how your BBC English differs from other variants? Or is it a case of "We may not be able to show you a real unicorn, but we all know what it is!" (Nayar.)

Emotion: wink
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Hi Inchoateknowledge,

Thanks for an intriguing post!


The one I often hear being referred to as BBC English.

I have spoken about it with some people who have been raised in an English-speaking country: South-Africa, USA, England, Scotland, Philippines, from the four corners of the world; and they were all of the opinion that what we hear on BBC is the language most widely understood and used.

General American English and most Canadian dialects of English are as widely understood as is 'BBC English'. General American English is much more common in the world on the whole than 'BBC English'. I should add that 'BBC English' as a term isn't very specific as so many dialects are represented on the BBC these days.
Do Ivy-league graduates, professors speak different dialects irrespective of where they were raised?
That would depend on the Ivy League graduate/professor. Most of them do not change their accents that much. They are, however, more likely to use a more 'standard' grammar than most other people, but this is, in fact, typical of any university graduates, not only those who were educated at an Ivy League institution.
Do graduates who came down from Oxford and speak with a plum in their mouth speak a different dialect from that their Ivy-league counterparts do?
Most people I've met who study/have studied at the University of Oxford do not sound 'plummy' at all. They mostly had what linguists call 'demotic RP accents' which is the way many educated people in England speak. Ivy League universities, on the other hand, are located in the US, and as you might guess, most people at these universities speak American rather than British English.

Englishuser

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MilkyDo you wish only to speak with such people?

No, but it is not a matter of my wishes that I do
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Inchoateknowledge
Milky
Do you wish only to speak with such people?

No, but it is not a matter of my wishes that I do

Are being controlled? Is someone forcing you to only communicate with such people? If so, that's bad news.
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