Here's a text from Longman dictionary:

# Don't say "I'd like to invite you…" or "I invite you…" Use one of the phrases "Do you want to come to the party?" or "Would you like to come for dinner on Tuesday?" #

Please, cold you explain me why it's not correct to say "I'd like to invite you…" or "I invite you…"?
Why we can say "I'd like to invite him." but we can't say "I'd like to invite you."?
Thanks in advance.
Full Member307
Amazing! I've never heard this before. It is quite common to say "I would like to invite you...~" What was the context of the dictionary examples?
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not completely sure but i believe its because, "would you like to come?" etc is a question posed, meaning it allows the other paty to give a response, however "i'd like to invite you" is a statement, not only this, it doesnt directly state the person is invited, due to the use of "i would" not "i am" and the other phrase, "you are invited" again, is a statement, not giving an option or possiblitiy of a formal reply stating if they would like to come or if they are going to come

though im not completely sure =/
New Member03
I think it's just that it is a rather formal way of phrasing it. You would use this wording in a written invitation rather than in speech.
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The norm (as indicated by Swan, Practical English Usage, Formality and Politeness, Polite requests and questions) in terms of English and American politeness is to make the invitation in a form which allows YES/NO answers (you must allow the responder the latitude of a refusal, you must not force yourself upon them). Yours don't.

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Request and questions can be made more polite by making them less direct. A common way of making requests less direct is to use yes/no questions. These suggest that the hearer can choose whether to agree or not.

Could you tell me the time, please?
(Much more polite than Please tell me the time.)

Swan
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Thus follow Longman's, they know what they are talking about.
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Thank you, everybody.

Marius Hancu, I think you're right. I looked through "Practical English Usage" by Swan and found that information. Thanks once more.
I also find it odd that you're told not to use that.

I'd like to invite you to... is fine. More formal, as Nona says, but certainly not wrong.

The person can say "Oh, thank you, I accept," or "Oh, I'm sorry, I must decline."
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