Hi again. I asked this question before here but somehow I can't find my post. Somebody had answered my question "Why is bread uncountable?" I remember not too much....

Also if bread is uncountable why isn't watermelon?
New Member19
Hi Hoca,

You can reach your previous posts by clicking the "my forums" button on the top of the page..

Best regards,

DjB
Senior Member2,089
Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
HocaHi again. I asked this question before here but somehow I can't find my post. Somebody had answered my question "Why is bread uncountable?" I remember not too much....

Also if bread is uncountable why isn't watermelon?
'Bir ekmek' is perfectly correct, but in English we say two loaves of bread two slices of bread, but not two breads. We can also have a slice of watermelon or two watermelons, or a watermelon. Why? Because languages are man-made and therefore subject to irregularity.
Veteran Member18,275
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
HocaHi again. I asked this question before here but somehow I can't find my post. Somebody had answered my question "Why is bread uncountable?" I remember not too much....Also if bread is uncountable why isn't watermelon?
Hello Hoca

In old times, Anglo-Saxons used "a bread" to mean "a broken piece", "a crumb" or "a bit". Instead they used "loaf" to mean the baked flour in a mass. So if the old Anglo-Saxon collocation had continued to be spoken as it was, we might now say "a bread of loaf". But in 10th century, the kids born with a Scandinavian as their father and an Anglo-Saxon as their mother somehow began to say "a loaf of bread".

As for "watermelon", you can say "watermelons" when you find them growing in the fields. But when you eat it, you should say just "watermelon" or "a piece/slice of watermelon". It is because people rarely eat a whole watermelon at once.

I'll eat a watermelon.


paco
Senior Member4,095
Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
if bread is uncountable why isn't watermelon?
The premisses of the question are incorrect. "watermelon" can also be uncountable.

Regardless of what word you use in your language for a loaf of bread - the object that can be carried about - "bread" in English is not an object, but a substance.
If I take a piece of bread, that is, a piece of the substance called "bread", and I divide it into five or six pieces, each of the pieces is also a piece of bread, that is, a piece of the substance called "bread". I can divide the pieces even further, and I still have pieces of bread. You cannot do that with an object, for example, a table. If I divide a table into five or six pieces, I do not have many pieces of the substance called "table"! "table" is countable, and "bread" is not.

"watermelon" can be used as an object -- the whole watermelon -- or as a substance -- the edible substance that comes from the watermelon. "I'm going to buy two watermelons" or "I'm hungry. I think I'll have some watermelon."

CJ
Veteran Member51,799
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
Live chat
Registered users can join here