Hello. I was wondering if native English speaker will pronounce "this" as "dis", "that" as "dat" when they are giving a rapid speech. And do you think it is acceptable for pronouncing "th" as "d" particularly when we are speaking quickly? Because, as an ELS learner, I occasionally find it rather challenging to rapidly relocate my tongue to between my rows of teeth after pronouncing certain words without impacting the overall speed of the speech.

For example, when I am speaking the below phrase as fast as I can while pronouncing "th" correctly, I will have a short pause between the words - "to" and "that". Nevertheless, if I pronounce "d" instead, I will be able to maintain a steady speed:
- I am not going to that place!

Another instance, this one is much more noticeable for my pause:
- I notice that that pinky ring is very suitable for you.

Please advise. Thanks a lot.
New Member04
I just thought ealrier today that "th" and "d" in fast unclear speech must be indistinguishable, after I heard something on youtube. I'll try to find it again. (EDIT: On second thought I think that depends a lot on the dialect. The one I heard must have had a New York accent or something).

However, in slow or normal speech there is a difference of course, but I still believe in some dialects it might be more difficult to hear it (New York accent?). In some dialects "th" and "d" are both pronounced as "d", so they are the same (African American English and some other accents).

If you can't talk normally then you are probably trying to overpronounce something, or you just don't practice enough.

I am not going to that place!<-- If you have trouble with this, maybe you need to practice more, because there are no difficult clusters to pronounce.

I notice that that pinky ring is very suitable for you. <-- Here you can pronounce the T in "that" as a glottal stop, so it becomes easy to say "tha(t) that pinky ring".

In other cases it might be difficult to pronounce "th" correctly, so you need to change the way you pronounce it. Your tongue won't be between your teeth anymore, but it'll be behind your upper teeth. The preceding consonant will be around the same position too. Some examples are:
Hit the ball (T + TH, if you don't replace the T with a glottal stop)
Find the ball (D + TH)
Can that man do it? (N + TH)
.. and so on.
Veteran Member5,652
Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.Trusted Users: Trusted users are allowed to use additional capabilities of the site such as private messaging to all users and various other advanced features. You cannot join this role unless you are promoted by an administrator.
Jesse S.Hello. I was wondering if native English speaker will pronounce "this" as "dis", "that" as "dat" when they are giving a rapid speech
No.
Contributing Member1,732
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
Live chat
Registered users can join here