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HI

Could anyone teach me how to use them
I saw a paragraph in which future tense was being used ,but "would" also appear in the same paragraph
Why is it so?
My classmate said the use of "would" is not related to the tense!
So could anyone tell me when I need to use them
thank you!

Keron
New Member06
Anonymous:
KeronHI

Could anyone teach me how to use them
I saw a paragraph in which future tense was being used ,but "would" also appear in the same paragraph
Why is it so?
My classmate said the use of "would" is not related to the tense!
So could anyone tell me when I need to use them
thank you!

Keron

http://www.englishpage.com/modals/modalintro.html
Hello Keron

For plain future tense (that is, mere statement of intention), the first person (1 or we) takes shall. For example, 'I shall go home' if 'I' was imply affirming my intention of going home in the future.

For plain future tense, the second person (you) and the third person (he, she, they, or a pronoun) takes will. For example, 'You will go home.'

'I will' or 'we will', on the other hand, is not used for a plain statement of intention, but only when there is a choice or volition. 'I will go home' meaning that if I had the choice of going or not going, that I really wanted to go home, that I had considered the possibility of not going home but discarded the idea. However, today, it is accepted that when using the first person will and shall may be interchanged.

When using other persons (you, he, they) will is still usually used unless a threat or a promise is implied:

'You shall pay for this!'

'They shall get the reward!'

The words 'should' and 'would' are the conditional forms of 'shall' and 'will' and the same rules apply.

If I said, 'I would (like to) go home.' it means that, given the choice of staying or going home, I should prefer to go home.

'Should' can also mean 'ought to'.
New Member21
May I butt in? I have two comments:

1. The use of I/we shall and all the other persons + will simply states a neutral future fact. I wouldn't speak of "intention" here. "Will" is more & more used in all the persons.

2. "You/he/she/they shall" does imply a threat or a promise, from the person who's speaking.
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Anonymous:
Pieanne2. "You/he/she/they shall" does imply a threat or a promise, from the person who's speaking.

Here it does:

You/he/she/they shall do exactly what we tell them to.

"will" forms the future.

I will try to pass the English test.
You will try to pass the English test.
He/She will try to pass the English test.
We will try to pass the English test.
You will try to pass the English test.
They will try to pass the English test.

"would" forms the future of the past.

I said I would try to pass the English test.
You said you would try to pass the English test.
...

"should" means several things. Here are the two most important ones:

'it is advisable':
It is advisable for you to study English every day.
= You should study English every day.

'it is expected':
It is expected that one baked potato is enough for each person.
= One baked potato should be enough for each person.

"shall" is rarely used in American English. Master the use of "will", "would", and "should" before worrying about "shall".

CJ
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To my understanding, will and shall are used in future tense of course.

But would and should aren't only used in past tense.

Sometimes "would" is a polite way to give an ask question:

Would you like to have your dinner with me?

"Would" be applied to Subjunctive If Cluases:

If I were rich, I would buy a Benz.

"Should" when not using to talk about sth. past, it means "ought to"

You should finish your assignment after class.

No one should commit crime.

"Would" and "should" have the meaning of "past" when their usage like this:

I would have done the essay.

I could have done the essay.
New Member33
sorry for stepping in...

How about the meaning of "shall" in expresion such as: "Let's begin, shall we?" , "Shall I start first? ", etc.

I don't think it expresses a future meaning and it's definitely not a threat ... so what is it?? I hear people use this all the time and I can roughly guess the meaning. But I don't know what it exactly means.

any comments will be appreciated.
Full Member105
Anonymous:
"Let´s begin, shall we? "and "Shall I start first? " are questions, referring to a suggestion.

Shall is often used in questions when using the first person (I, we) when:



1. asking for permission,

2. making suggestions,

3. making an offer

4. asking for advice /opinion



  1. Shall I close the door?
  2. What shall I do?/ Shall I start first?
  3. Shall we go home?
  4. Shall I do that?
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