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Is this sentence correct?

If Steven had offered to give me a lift, I wouldn’t have had to take a taxi

Even if the sentence reads strange (would + have to), I don't feel like using "I shouldn't have taken a taxi" because should usually sounds as recommandation, obligation, probability etc, and this is not the case (compare with: " I should have warned Adam about Barbara: she’s such a gossip!")

But, it is correct? Is there a different way to express the same sentence?

Thank you in advance
New Member13
'wouldn’t have had to take' is OK. OR 'wouldn't have taken'
Contributing Member1,039
Thanks Emotion: smile
For the 1st persons, in this context (conditionals):

BrE: I/we should have ...
AmE: I/we would have ...

To the OP: I'd suggest to buy Swan, Practical English Usage.
Veteran Member11,673
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Diamondrg'wouldn’t have had to take' is OK. OR 'wouldn't have taken'
These don't mean quite the same.
The first accentuates the fact that he was forced to take a taxi (see had).
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Marius Hancu
Diamondrg'wouldn’t have had to take' is OK. OR 'wouldn't have taken'
These don't mean quite the same.
The first accentuates the fact that he was forced to take a taxi (see had).

yeah they are not the same, but in such a situation both can be used depending on one's intended meaning.
The likely contexts are indeed different:

1. If Steven had offered to give me a lift, I wouldn’t have taken a taxi.

— You would say this if e.g. you wanted to give a reason for taking a taxi. The focus is on the 2nd clause.

2. If Steven had offered to give me a lift, I wouldn’t have had to take a taxi.

— You would say this if e.g. you wanted to point out that Steve should have offered you a lift. The focus is on the 1st clause.

3. If Steven had offered to give me a lift, I shouldn’t have had to take a taxi.

— Some BrE speakers might say this, with the meaning of #2 (i.e. with no sense of "ought to" in "should"); but it's increasingly rare.

MrP
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MrPedantic:

How about using "should" at 1 too, in BrE?
I think it could be used, with the same obs you made at 3 (decreasing usage).

EDIT: OK, I realize now that "would" is the choice at 1 even in older BrE usage, because it involves my volition/will.

The "had" in the 2nd shows that I couldn't exercise my volition, because I was forced to do something. Thus the possible choice for "should."
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Hello Marius

Yes, "should" would be possible in #1 too, in older/less common BrE usage.

(I should have added: only in the 1st person, though.)

MrP
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