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Hi! today a girl told me that there's another way to say "your welcome", she told something like "thankankyou" this when replying to "thanks". I don't know if it's true. Thanks for helping!
Full Member110
Hi,

today a girl told me that there's another way to say "your welcome", she told something like "thankankyou" this when replying to "thanks".

There are a number of ways you can reply when someone says 'Thanks'. eg

You're welcome

Thank you (with the stress on the last syllable. The meaning is that I want to thank you.)

No problem. (This is very common in informal, spoken English. Some people, including me, find it irritating)

There's also the choice, rather neglected these days, of just accepting the thanks and saying nothing in return.

Best wishes, Clive
Veteran Member69,557
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Thanks for answering Clive you're very kind as ever Emotion: wink . Sorry for my foolish mistake. None of the answers you gave sound like that told by the girl who talked with me... if someone knows that exists something like "than ank you" in replying to "thanks" please let me know!
Could it be "not at all"? I learnt that as a way to respond to "thanks". I don't know if people use it, though.
Full Member104
It could have been:

"And thank you!"

where the "And" was shorted to "An":

"An' thank you!"

MrP
Veteran Member12,806
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
Hi

What I have noticed, most people just say "yop". Some interjection. That's it. "You are welcome" is more like a big thing and is not really often said . "You are welcome", is also used if people say thank you sarcastically meant.

Jake
Full Member207
Hi guys,

I think there is probably a great deal of regional variation in these responses to 'Thank you'.

Clive
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"That's ok" is quite common in the UK. "Don't mention it" now sounds a little quaint or sarcastic. "No probs" is much used by IT helpdesk personnel. "My pleasure" seems a bit salesperson-ish. I used to hear "Uh huh" quite often from AmE-speakers. "You're welcome" can have a supplier-to-client air, in BrE. And I'm afraid some people say "cool!".

Maybe a smile and a nod's best.

MrP
Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.Retired Moderator: A moderator who has retired.
What about "anytime" ?
Junior Member57
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