RE: Yours sincerely or Sincerely yours? page 4

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Anonymous:
I have not read the other replies. But before exiting this page it dawned on me that I have an answer for you (maybe not the right answer but an answer nonetheless). In English the adjective most often precedes the noun. So "sincerley" would qualify the "yours". In this usage, "yours" therefore is used as a noun. An aside: in French it's vôtre (the noun) and votre (the adjectif).
Anonymous:
Dear Alexander:

So many years after you have asked the question about the use of "Yours Sincerely" or "Sincerely Yours", but here is your answer, from wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complimentary_close ):

Complimentary close

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A complimentary close or complimentary closing is an expression or phrase that immediately precedes the signature in a letter, email, or other correspondence. The word or words so written express respect, esteem, or regard for the person to whom the correspondence is directed. In American English, a complimentary close is also less commonly referred to as a valediction, which usually means the act of saying farewell, especially orally.[1]

English complimentary closings typically contain the possessive pronoun yours. "Yours truly" and "yours sincerely" (or the variant, "sincerely yours") were by far the most common in mid-20th century, and were taught as standard closings; "truly" in business letters and "sincerely" in personal letters. Earlier style closings were usually much longer, and often a complete sentence. For example:


I beg to remain, Sir, your most humble and obedient servant,
A.B.
This kind of ceremonious closing is still in use in some countries, for instance in France and Italy, and in formal correspondence in the military.

Yours sincerely

In the UK, traditional complimentary closes have largely been replaced by the use of "Yours sincerely" or "Yours faithfully", a shorter form of the archaic "I am yours sincerely". Yours sincerely is typically employed in British English when the recipient is addressed by name and is known to the sender to some degree, whereas Yours faithfully is used when the recipient is not known by name (i.e. the recipient is addressed by a phrase such as "Dear Sir/Madam"). One way to remember this is the saying "S and S never go together" (for Sir and Sincerely respectively). When the recipient's name is known, but not previously met or spoken with, some people prefer the use of the more distant Yours faithfully, at the risk of annoying the recipient.

In the US, "Sincerely yours" or "Sincerely" is commonly used in formal correspondence. "Faithfully yours" is rare. Other formulas such as "Best wishes" and "Best regards" (see below) are also common in formal correspondence. In contrast to British English (see above) there is no special convention for combining these with any particular salutation.

Best Regards,

Flavio
Anonymous:
Hi!
Historically speaking, due to the free topic of the Latin grammar, it shouldn't be any difference.
At least, I do not seize any possible difference, except perhaps the conventions of certain professions (public clerk, lawyers etc.): like you have in French certain formal letters endings, or in German the formal Sie instead of Du...
Good luck!
Raul
Anonymous:
I found an explanation about your question:



Maybe this will help you to understand the different.
Anonymous:
Hello Belldandy 29,

I have been doing some research for you. When i saw your question i really wanted to know the answer as well. I want to become an English teacher, so I thought i would help you.
I found the answer about the saying:

Yours sincerely is typical Britisch English and it must be used when writing to someone that you have met or spoken to. It is necessary that you address them by their first names, sign the letter Yours sincerely,and use your first name in the signature. This way of ending a letter is more personal.

In American English, "Sincerely yours" or "Sincerely" is commonly used in formal correspondence. It means that ''Sincerely yours is :
1. American English
2. More formal
Coming back to your question I would deffiniatley chose Sincerely yours because you are aware of the persons name, although if it is a formal letter I would advise you to use yours Sincerely.

This is my first year at university so I am not sure that all the information that i gave you now is completley right. I did my best to find the correct information for you. I must admitt that I thought English was a very easy language but I think i was wrong. Now while going to University I learn so many new things.

English is not my mother tongue but I am doing my utter best to understand and learn everything that has to do with the English language.

I think i have to end this letter with Yours sincerely because :
I know your name ( nickname) and I rather stick to the Britisch English then American English.

If you have more questions about my respond, feel free to send me a reply.
Good luck.

Yours Sincerely,
Bo
Hello Belldandy 29,

I have been doing some research for you. When i saw your question i really wanted to know the answer as well. I want to become an English teacher, so I thought i would help you.
I found the answer about the saying:

Yours sincerely is typical Britisch English and it must be used when writing to someone that you have met or spoken to. It is necessary that you address them by their first names, sign the letter Yours sincerely,and use your first name in the signature. This way of ending a letter is more personal.

In American English, "Sincerely yours" or "Sincerely" is commonly used in formal correspondence. It means that ''Sincerely yours is :
1. American English
2. More formal
Coming back to your question I would deffiniatley chose Sincerely yours because you are aware of the persons name, although if it is a formal letter I would advise you to use yours Sincerely.

This is my first year at university so I am not sure that all the information that i gave you now is completley right. I did my best to find the correct information for you. I must admitt that I thought English was a very easy language but I think i was wrong. Now while going to University I learn so many new things.

English is not my mother tongue but I am doing my utter best to understand and learn everything that has to do with the English language.

I think i have to end this letter with Yours sincerely because :
I know your name ( nickname) and I rather stick to the Britisch English then American English.

If you have more questions about my respond, feel free to send me a reply.
Good luck.

Yours Sincerely,
Bo
New Member02
Hello Belldandy 29,

I have been doing some research for you. When i saw your question i really wanted to know the answer as well. I want to become an English teacher, so I thought i would help you.
I found the answer about the saying:
Yours sincerely is typical Britisch English and it must be used when writing to someone that you have met or spoken to. It is necessary that you address them by their first names, sign the letter Yours sincerely,and use your first name in the signature. This way of ending a letter is more personal.

In American English, "Sincerely yours" or "Sincerely" is commonly used in formal correspondence. It means that ''Sincerely yours is :
1. American English
2. More formal
Coming back to your question I would deffiniatley chose Sincerely yours because you are aware of the persons name, although if it is a formal letter I would advise you to use yours Sincerely.

This is my first year at university so I am not sure that all the information that i gave you now is completley right. I did my best to find the correct information for you. I must admitt that I thought English was a very easy language but I think i was wrong. Now while going to University I learn so many new things.

English is not my mother tongue but I am doing my utter best to understand and learn everything that has to do with the English language.
I think i have to end this letter with Yours sincerely because :
I know your name ( nickname) and I rather stick to the Britisch English then American English.

If you have more questions about my respond, feel free to send me a reply.
Good luck.

Yours Sincerely,
Bo
Anonymous:
Wrong, if you don't know the name, you should use Yours faithfully
Anonymous:
England is in Britain, not America. Enough Said.
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