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The road continues beyond the village up into the hills. Does it mean the road ends at the beginning of the village and continues from the end of the village? I mean there is no road in the village, right? Please help me out.
 
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Hi Is the response from B natural English? A - Why didn't you finish your tea? B - I could smell sour milk in it. [B means to say that she felt that the milk used in the tea had turned sour/gone off] Thanks, Tom
 
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"Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once." From the above context, you can tell that the author is contrasting two ideas -"cowards" and "the valiant." Therefore, "the valiant" means the opposite of "cowards," namely "brave people." Valiant means "brave." Source : Vocabulary for the High School Student by Robert T. Levine idea /aɪˈdɪə/ n any content of the mind, esp the conscious mind the thought of something: the very idea appals me an individual's conception of something: his idea of honesty is not the same as yours and mine the belief that something is the case a scheme, intention, plan, etc a vague notion or indication; inkling: he had no idea of what life would be like in Africa significance or purpose: the idea of the game is to discover the murderer a private mental object, regarded as the immediate object of thought or perception get ideas ⇒ to become ambitious, restless, etc not one's idea of ⇒ not what one regards as (hard work, a holiday, etc) that's an idea ⇒ that is worth considering the very idea! ⇒ that is preposterous, unreasonable, etc Hello, Would you please tell me that the red word ( idea ) in my context, refers to which one of the meanings? (I have asked this question in another forum but have not received a clear response.) I'm confused Thank you...
 
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What is the correct way to make a possessive that would mean the following: The cat belongs to Will Anderson Jr.
 
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Would you see the below sentences? He used to walk along the shore (with a) pipe in (his) mouth. He walked along the street limping (with a) stick in (his) hand. What cause can the words 'with a' be omitted for ? In advance, Thank you for your help.
 
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My first question is about the 'causative'... If I take this sentence: 'I have my car repaired', then, according to me, these are the tenses... Present I have my car repaired I am having my car repaired I have had my car repaired I have been having my car repaired (????) Past I had my car repaired I was having my car repaired I had had my car repaired I had been having my car repaired (????) Future I will have my car repaired I will be having my car repaired I will have had my car repaired I will have been having my car repaired (????) Questions: 1. Is this list OK? 2. What are the negatives of this list? Present I don't have my car repaired? I am not having my car repaired? I have not had my car repaired? I have not been having my car repaired (????) Past I hadn't had my car repaired I wasn't having my car repaired? I hadn't had my car repaired? I hadn't been having my car repaired (????) Future I will not have my car repaired? I will not be having my car repaired? I will not have had my car repaired? I will not have been having my car repaired (????) Especially the perfect continuous tenses look and sound strange to me... Thanks in advance...
 
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Can someone please tell me if the text below is grammatically correct? I've also written this text in equations. Have I covered all aspects of a hypothesis paragraph? "It is hypothesized that on average infrastructural development will be positively correlated with economic performance. This null hypothesis builds on the assumption that both variables are correlated, and that the dependent variable is contingent upon the condition of the independent variables. Therefore, the alternative hypothesis states that on average infrastructural development will not be positively correlated with economic performance."
 
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Hi, What does mean"" kitchen sink approach"" in medical textbook? We give these medications as part of the “kitchen sink approach” but the treatment of acute asthma is... Thank you in advance.
 
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I know that the 'linking verb' is followed by a noun (phrase, clause) or an adjective (phrase, clause) , same as the following sentences. I am a boy . (a noun) I became a doctor . (a noun) I am sick . (an adjective) The rotten apples are on the table . (an adjective phrase) Our missing the train is because you are late . (a noun clause) I feel as though I'm going to give it up soon . (an adjective clause) The Forum rules say "Ask about only one topic in each thread". This is so you can give the thread a very specific title and make it easier for others to find the answers that are given. In the above sentences, Is the 'so that'clause a 'noun clause' or if not, an 'adjective clause'? In advance, Thank you for your help.
 
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Please correct my grammar if there's any. Thank you. Happy birthday!!! I pray that you’ll always be well and free of any kind of illness ‘cuz. above anything else, the greatest happiness a mother would want to her children is to see them in good health through the years to come. May you succeed in everything you do and all your aspirations in life come true. God bless you always!
 
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Hi. What does 'consistently' mean in: Nobody likes to work with people who are consistently unprofessional. ?Thanks in advance
 
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"Setting multiple alarms is the key to early rising ." I have seen the sentence and I was wondering if early here modifies rising as an adjective or an adverb? I think that it is in front of rising so it functions as an adjective. What do you native English speakers think? Thank you so much for your time and help as usual!
 
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Below is sentences I found on the internet. In each sentence, a underlined 'whether' or interrogative clause is equivalent to a followed noun in bold. pattern #1 - the interrogative content clause without 'of' 1)We need to analyze the cause why we failed . 2)John raised the question when the money would be collected . 3)The question arose who was to receive him . 4)The key question what caused the leak remains unanswered . 5)Can you give me a general idea when it will be done . 6)I have only a vague notion why she washes for a living . pattern #2 - the whether clause without 'of' 7)Nobody can be sure of the possibility whether he will show up . pattern #3 - 'interrogative plus infinitive' without 'of' 8)Our previous meeting looked at the issue how to increase income . Are the above sentences proper and Is this method indicating the equal to a followed noun without 'of' often used in the spoken English? In advance, Thank you for your help....
 
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Why use it; seems redundant for a date.
 
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can a sentence contain the same preposition more than once or twice?
 
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I just heard this weird expression. A: (Scheduling a time)How about tomorrow? B: Tomorrow it is. Can I use it in this way? A: Can I be your friend? B: A friend it is! / A friend you are! A: Let's go for a walk. B: A walk it is. A: Do you think I'm a lousy house keeper? B: A lousy house keeper it is! / A lousy house keeper you are!
 
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I just want to write an email to someone saying that i can't attend the meeting scheduled for a particular day due to some other meetings. So i drafted an email as follows ..I have a conflict in my schedule that day. But that's Ok. One of my colleague,Mr. x will be present onsite. Is there any better wording i can use in this context instead of that's Ok or pls help me to rephrase same sentence with out losing it's essence?
 
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can you please send me your email address to Email Removed , i would like you to help me with a motivational letter