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    Dear teachers, Would you please help me analyzing the following sentences and tell me which adverbials are optional and which ones are obligatory? 1. They parted good friends. “good friends” = Subject complement or Adverbial (optional or obligatory) ? 2. ...
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    (1) Margarine can substitute for butter in this recipe. (2) Butter can be substituted with margarine in this recipe. (3) Margarine can be substituted for butter in this recipe. Can all these sentences be read as “margarine can take the place of ...
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    Sorry abuot this again, I fear I'm becoming somewhat of a pain. But I have to fully get it. From what I gathered, Adjective Prepositional Phrases modifies nouns/pronouns or object of another preposition, eg.: The book on the table in the English ...
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    Hello everybody, I have two questions about the word "where" . 1.I've been told that "where" in the following sentence is a pronoun by its form : Where did you get to? And the explanation is that in possible answer like: I got to page 4. it stands ...
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    To my way of thinking, the following use of “yourself” and “myself” is wrong and sounds really clumsy: A. This morning I sent a reply to yourself. A. This morning you sent a reply to myself. Surely these should be: B. This morning I sent a reply to you. B. This ...
  • I am thinking about how to form a noun meaning "one-who-does-something" from a phrasal verb (eg. "wash up") ... the convention seems to be to add -er to the verb as well as the preposition (eg. "washer upper"). This sounds weird to me, but better ...
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    Please can people here help me with my understanding of phrasal verbs - thanks. Ok, a phrasal verb is verb plus a particle. That particle can be a preposition or an adverb, however, when used with a verb to create a new meaning (indistinguishable ...
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    fusker Expand On : say more about (Phrasal verb consisting of a verb followed by an a preposition) Catch On : be widely accepted (Phrasal verb consisting of a verb followed by an an adverb) How do we identify that wheather the word following ...
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    1) This was an example on an internet site: 'That must be him on the phone' The site suggested that it should read, 'that must be he on the phone' Their justification was this: the nominative form of the pronoun following the verb be Now, I ...
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    I'm copying the following text from some other source: Round can work as a noun, an adjective, a verb, an adverb and a preposition. Around can work as an adverb or a preposition. Examples given for each word, when they act as prepositions, are: around ...
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