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2013.03.12.21.45
Knafeh
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I was wondering which of the sentences below is correct or if both are acceptable. If so, is there some difference in meaning? a) I haven't played tennis in years/months/days b) I haven't played tennis for years/months/days Thanks for your help Emotion: smile
 They are both acceptable and mean the same thing. Emotion: smile
 Hello.
I believe both sentences effectively mean the same.
It may be that for gives a sense of delibrateness, while in makes it sound unplanned or that just happened.. , however.
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Hi; I am wondering if "something" can be interchangeable with "anything"? What about this sentence? "I don't want you to do something stupid." Can you please advise? Thank you
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Hello teachers, Could you please confirm my assumptions? Letter 'a' is a wrong answer, and letters 'b; c' are correct answers according to the question. I think I would only use 'because' at the beginning if I had both the cause and effect; right? Why doe ...
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Hello teachers, I found this sentence on the internet: Nadal ranked World No. 2 behind Federer for a record 160 weeks. Shouldn't it be, '... for a record of 160 weeks'? Thanks in advance.
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Hello teachers, I think the correct one is 'a' because the past perfect requires another verb in the simple past tense. For example: "She had been out of the house almost the whole day when I arrived'. Am I right in my assumption? a) Mrs. Taylor has been ...
 
CalifJim (It says "as soon as she got home", not "when she arrived", by the way.)
Not that, I was referring to the first sentence ("When she returned .."), and I wasn't quoting literally - just saying.. .
When it says in the second sentence that She had been out of the house most of the day, I understand it's talking relative ...
 
SurferThat is totally fine, however, saying...
When there are several events that occur in a sequence there are not enough tenses in English to indicate every event in its proper sequence. Therefore it is a matter of emphasizing the order of events for whatever the writer believes are the ...
 Thank you, CJ.
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