CalifJim's public profile. You can only see this limited content.
  • Activity
  • Videos
replied to 's question.
5
Replies
Is that possible to bring a noun before the adjective? any examples?
 Thank you. How about the names of the movies? For example "mission impossible"?
 Thank you Jim. Why isn't my question correct? : Is that possible...?
 
nazanin saryazdiThank you Jim. Why isn't my question...
Is that possible to bring a noun before the adjective?
Because you have a post-posed subject. That kind of subject can only be replaced by "it".
To bring a noun before the adjective is possible? >
It is possible to bring a noun before the adjective? > ...
replied to 's question.
3
Replies
Hi, What does "one-figure" mean in the following sentence? "Barclays explained afterwards that a one-figure error in an international transaction meant the money had gone to her by mistake." Regards, Iman
 
imantaghavione-figure error
Writing 254,647 for 234,647, or writing 64,754.58 for 64,759.58, and so on. The mistaken figure in question seems to have been a routing code.
CJ
 Thank you CJ. So you mean some numbers were alike in shape? like 4 and 9?
 
imantaghaviThank you CJ. So you mean some...
No. There was a typo on one digit of the entire sequence.
CJ ...
replied to 's question.
3
Replies
Hello, Sometimes I get confused with the usage of "in order to". 1.She arrived early in order to get a good seat. Can I paraphrase the above sentence such as a) She arrived early because she wanted to get a good seat. So it seems that "in order to" ...
 I think "in order to" is to with the intention. Your examples substantiate them just as this:
I came early in order to receive all the guests.
hanuman_2000So it seems that "in order to" is...
I think the same. ...
 
hanuman_2000She arrived early because she wanted to get a good seat.So it seems that "in...
Close, but not exactly. Look at what you've written. "in order to" is not like "because" alone; it is like "because ... want(ed) to".
CJ ...
Anonymous 
hanuman_2000Sometimes I get confused with the...
I'm a non-native. I understand the "in order to" phrase as an introduction of purpose in which the phrase can be substituted for another "for the purpose of" as in She arrived early for the purpose of getting a good seat. In my opinion, there is ...
replied to 's question.
5
Replies
If I had gone to her party, James would have seen me. If he had seen me, I should have invited him to my house. So, I didn't go to the party. If you had wanted, you could have been wearing that hat for me for five minutes. Are these sentences ...
 
tenjingIf I had lent the money to James,...
It's correct. I prefer the following, however:
If I had lent the money to James, Rocky might have thought I was friendlier to James than to Rocky.
CJ ...
  Thank you so much, CJ. I have one more question. The meaning between ' If I had lent the money to James, Rocky might have thought I was friendlier to James than to Rocky' and ' If I had lent the money to James, Rocky may have thought I was ...
  He didn't pick up the phone. He may have been asleep at that time.~ If Rocky had lent the money to James, Alex may have thought Rocky was friendlier to James than him. Both sentence have the same meaning of 'may', right?
You could have helped ...
replied to 's question.
2
Replies
I have a pretty complicated question regarding the proper grammatical syntax and use of the word "thereof." Does it require plural or singular objects in sentence construction? Or does it matter? Can I say (for example): "The papers and the words ...
 
Serpensthereof
= "of it" or "of them", depending what was mentioned earlier in the text, but not the noun(s) immediately before "thereof".
In your examples, "it" or "them" would be something you haven't even written in your example.
Pay attention to this paragraph, and ...
 
CalifJimNone of this has anything to do with...
The problem that I am having is that both objects in the sentence I am trying to understand could be interpreted in a singular or an aggregate sense, and the exact meaning of the sentence changes entirely depending upon which interpretation, ...
Show more
Veteran Member
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.

Joined Aug 02 2004 05:23:05
+7 rating power (218 cast)
+1907 verified answers
+7919 on all content
+7919 on forum posts