Florida State University has put up a very interesting Java applet on its Web site. It begins as a view of the Milky Way Galaxy viewed from a distance of 10 million light years and then zooms in towards Earth in powers of ten of distance -10 million, to one million, to 100,000 light years, etc., until it finally reaches a large oak tree leaf. But that is not all. It zooms into the leaf until it reaches to the level of the quarks viewed at 100 attometers.
==
I didn't write any of the above, so don't ask me what an attometer is. Also, there are various kinds of oak trees in this world, and the one pictured has leaves that look nothing like the leaves on the oak tree in my back yard. I never realized before that the leaves from oak to oak were that different. So I took a trip to Google Images to check it out.

Imagine just a few minutes with the site and I'm already doing some "research." This should be a good site for aue'ers, the generally curious, and most kids, I would think.
http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu / (reassembly needed)
primer/java/ scienceopticsu/
powersof10/index.html
or
http://tinyurl.com/hck
The download is not instantaneous, at least not on DSL.

There's a lot more at this site than what is described above. (If this URL was posted in aue before, I don't remember it. So maybe it's new...?)
Enjoy.
Maria Conlon
1 2 3 4
There's a lot more at this site than what is described above. (If this URL was posted in aue before, I don't remember it. So maybe it's new...?)

That was very cool. I thought it was even more impressive going from small to big. It's quite amazing how quickly things increase in increments of 10.

Dena Jo
Email goes to denajo2 at the dot com variation of the Yahoo domain. Have I confused you? Go here:
http://myweb.cableone.net/denajo/emailme.htm
... I thought it was even more impressive going from small to big. It's quite amazing how quickly things increase in increments of 10.

They're factors, not increments. You're multiplying each time. (And I say this just from the description, without even having seen the web site.)

Mark Brader > "The good news is that the Internet is dynamic. Toronto > The bad news is that the Internet is dynamic." (Email Removed) > Peter Neumann
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Maria Conlon (quoted):
Florida State University has put up a very interesting Java applet on its Web site. It begins as a view ... all. It zooms into the leaf until it reaches to the level of the quarks viewed at 100 attometers. ==

That reminds me of this:
(Amazon.com, Powers of Ten, http://tinyurl.com/3gywt )

Starting with a view of a billion light-years, the book (like the film) moves inward, with each page being at one-tenth the scale of the previous one.
One attometer appears to be a measure of length 1 x 10^-18m. The prefix "atto" is, I read, from the Danish "atten" = "eighteen".

R.
There's a lot more at this site than what is ... aue before, I don't remember it. So maybe it's new...?)

That was very cool. I thought it was even more impressive going from small to big. It's quite amazing how quickly things increase in increments of 10.

Don't forget the power of binary. How many times can you fold a piece of paper in half (without unfolding it at any stage)?

I have a little Flipbook 'Powers of Ten', a product of http://www.eamesoffice.com /
and 'based on the film by Charles and Roy Eames'. It starts at the -10 million light years (10^23 meters), zooms in to Chicago's Lake Shore Drive and Marina and a guy asleep at a picnic and progresses to 10^-15 meters and a single proton.
The Florida applet is a lot cooler because you don't have to flip pages with your thumb.
The Eames Flipbook is at
http://www.eamesoffice.com/catalog/detail.php?category=103&prod id=238

And the wallchart at
http://www.eamesoffice.com/catalog/detail.php?category=157&prod id=209

(They seem to have modified the imagery so they now go down to the quark at 10^-18 and up to 10^+25
And, of course, the movie and, now, interactive CD: http://www.eamesoffice.com/films/Powers of Ten.html

They even got reviewed on the Eye Em Dee Bee:
http://uk.imdb.com/title/tt0078106/combined

John Dean
Oxford
Don't forget the power of binary.

Can't resist.
There are 10 kinds of people in the world: Those who understand binary, and those who don't.
How many times can you fold a piece of paper in half (without unfolding it at any stage)?

An 8 1/2 by 11 piece of paper, six.

Dena Jo
Email goes to denajo2 at the dot com variation of the Yahoo domain. Have I confused you? Go here:
http://myweb.cableone.net/denajo/emailme.htm
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They're factors, not increments.

Yes, of course.

Dena Jo
Email goes to denajo2 at the dot com variation of the Yahoo domain. Have I confused you? Go here:
http://myweb.cableone.net/denajo/emailme.htm
This is one time when size doesn't matter.
Can't resist. There are 10 kinds of people in the ... don't. An 8 1/2 by 11 piece of paper, six.

This is one time when size doesn't matter.

Really?

I dunno. The sixth time was really, really hard.

Dena Jo
Email goes to denajo2 at the dot com variation of the Yahoo domain. Have I confused you? Go here:
http://myweb.cableone.net/denajo/emailme.htm
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