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Hello, everyone.

I've got a question.

My girl friend and I were supposed to dinner out at 7.

It was 6:50.

And my girl said to me, "We have 10 more minutes.(So why don't you get ready?)"

Then I wonder whether that sentence is correct or not.

I suppose that "We have 10 minutes left."

We had a little argument. Emotion: smile

Could you guys let me know which one is correct?
Thanks in advance.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Grammar Geek
My American ear prefers "I have 10 more minutes" but I don't know that that is universal.

It seems a Britain speaker would be welcome here. I don't know why, but to me "10 minutes more" sounds more natural.
It seems a British speaker would be welcome here. I don't know why, but to me "10 minutes more" sounds more natural.
I would say - 10 minutes more. But in truth I would probably avoid this and say "another 10 minutes"
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Darn it, I felt there was something wrong with the word but couldn't figure out what exactly. Thanks. Emotion: embarrassed

Ick, reading all these now I can't tell which is more natural, lol.

For the original question, both options sound fine to me.

With regards to 'ten minutes more' or 'ten more minutes', both are used, but possibly in some situations you are more likely to use one than the other. I think 'ten more minutes' is the more common of the two.

One distinction would be that 'ten minutes more' is adding extra time. You should be ready by 8pm but you are running late and ask if you can have 'ten minutes more'. Although you could also use 'ten more minutes' here as well.

However, if you are still within the original time limit - it's now 7.50pm and you ask how much time you have left - you'll be told you have 'ten more minutes' and not 'ten minutes more'.
I think that 10 mins left is right.... my friend thinks that 10 more mins is right..... idk....
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Either one is fine, and as others have said, they mean similar things but emphasize differently.

But in this case, since both of you refer to the scarcity of the time available, I'd suggest adding in 'only', and it will serve to bring the two sentences even closer.

"I only have 10 more minutes"

"I only have 10 mintues left (until...)"
Emotion: yawni dont get it
The differences in these sentences are akin to glass half-empty/glass half-full. Both are factually accurate. One could say that '10 more minutes' is more optimistic, focussing on the remaining time as a useable period (as you may do if you were a losing team in a sports game). Adding 'only' to this as mentioned above would modify it to be less luxurious-sounding. '10 minutes left' is a little more of a statement, but focusses on the diminishing element of the time. It may be possible to make counter arguments and we could go at that for eternity.

As a procrastinator, I will remain inactive for the first half of the remaining 10 minutes feeling that there is more time remaining, then panic in the final 5 because there is only a little left.

I think, though, that you may have raised this question simply as a distraction from what I'm sure you perceived clearly as the real message of her speach act: 'get your ass in gear and be ready to leave in 10 minutes time'.
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You won't have a girlfriend for much longer if you're constantly corrected her grammar (to the point of finding it necessary to "question her insolence" online.)
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