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Please check the following sentences:

1: None of the students are going.

2: None of the students is going.

I know sentence #1 is correct because the book says so. If it were up to me, then I would consider the sentence #2 correct rather than the sentence #1. None is singular, not plural. None means not a single. Right?
Comments  
This is what the OED says:

— USAGE Some traditionalists maintain that none can only take a singular verb (as in none of them is coming tonight rather than none of them are coming tonight). However, none is descended from Old English nan meaning ‘not one’, and has been used for around a thousand years with either a singular or a plural verb, depending on the context and the emphasis needed.
Feebs11This is what the OED says:

— USAGE Some traditionalists maintain that none can only take a singular verb (as in none of them is coming tonight rather than none of them are coming tonight). However, none is descended from Old English nan meaning ‘not one’, and has been used for around a thousand years with either a singular or a plural verb, depending on the context and the emphasis needed.
Please explain the above underlined line.
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Jackson6612
Feebs11This is what the OED says:

— USAGE Some traditionalists maintain that none can only take a singular verb (as in none of them is coming tonight rather than none of them are coming tonight). However, none is descended from Old English nan meaning ‘not one’, and has been used for around a thousand years with either a singular or a plural verb, depending on the context and the emphasis needed.
Please explain the above underlined line.

HELP!
Hi,
I always use a plural verb with "none". I see it as the same as "some", "many", etc.
Many people are here. Many are here.
Some people are here. Some are here.
None of people are here. None are here.

Exception: I use a singualr verb in cases like:
None of them was MacGyver. (not "were". There can only be one MacGyver)

Some people use it with a singular verb more often, but I think most people (at least Americans) generally use it with a plural verb, like me. Emotion: smile

Just my point of view.
KooyeenHi,
I always use a plural verb with "none". I see it as the same as "some", "many", etc.
Many people are here. Many are here.
Some people are here. Some are here.
None of people are here. None are here.

Exception: I use a singualr verb in cases like:
None of them was MacGyver. (not "were". There can only be one MacGyver)

Some people use it with a singular verb more often, but I think most people (at least Americans) generally use it with a plural verb, like me. Emotion: smile

Just my point of view.
Thank you for a very lucid explanation, Kooyeen. Take care. [Suggestions are still welcome]

Best wishes, Jackson
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none means no one. you would say no one is going, right?
even if you say not a single one, you would say not a single one is going.
eg: a single person was walking on the road.
negation: not a single person was walking on the road.

Is it like None of the student is are going.

Jackson6612Please check the following sentences:
1: None of the students are going.
2: None of the students is going.

I know sentence #1 is correct because the book says so. If it were up to me, then I would consider the sentence #2 correct rather than the sentence #1. None is singular, not plural. None means not a single. Right?

Both sentences are correct.

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