Hi

Is everything fine with these two sentences below?

1.She taught both in a primary school and a high school, but frankly she didn’t like her work at primary school. She had known before she went to teach there that she wouldn’t have liked it. She was just a substitute for a teacher who was on maternity leave.

2.What she's noticed is that when you teach small children you need to keep them interested all the time. That’s why the lesson must be much more varied than when you teach adults for example.
Hi,

1.She taught both in a primary school and a high school, but frankly she didn’t like her work at primary school. She had known before she went to teach there that she wouldn’t have liked it. She was just a substitute for a teacher who was on maternity leave.
2.What she's noticed is that when you teach small children you need to keep them interested all the time. That’s why the lesson must be much more varied than when you teach adults for example.

1.She taught both in a primary school and a high school (or in both a primary school and a high school), but frankly she didn’t like her work in primary school.

She knew before she went to teach there that she wouldn’t like it. She was just a substitute for a teacher who was on maternity leave.

2.What she has noticed is that, when you teach small children, you need to keep them interested all the time. That’s why the lesson must be much more varied than when you teach, for example, adults.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi Clive.

I understand everything, but is "she had known before she went to teach there that she wouldn't have liked it" really wrong?

I'm writing about something that happened in the past.
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"she wouldn't have liked it" -- IF she had gone there (and she didn't).

Since in your example, she DID go there, the "wouldn't have liked it" is wrong.
I think I understand. Thanks.