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Could you please help me correct these sentences?

I have 2 questions;

Here is the situation,

When you turn the faucet on weak (the water trickles and isn't consistent, when it hits the base of the sink it splatters, splashes everywhere. (how do you say the bold?)

Can you say:

Don't turn the faucet on (too) weak as the water will splatter/splash everywhere.

and the second situation:

Lets say you work a night shift and your wife day shifts. When you get, you stay awake until 11 am. She goes to work at 10 am. You stay on the phone with your wife the first hour of her shift everyday. When she gets home she goes to sleep at 11 pm. You got to work at 10 pm and you guys are on the phone the first hour of your shift until she goes to bed at 11 pm.

How would you express this please?

1 I'm awake and on the phone with you the first hour of your shift from 10 am to 11 am just like you're on the phone with me the first hour of mine from 10 pm to 11 pm. We sleep through all but one hour (the first hour) of each others shifts.

2 We are awake for the first hour of each others shifts and sleep for the rest of the duration of one another's shifts.

Thank you
Comments  
Same questions again!
Can someone please help me correct these 2 thoughts?

Thank you
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Alex, you come up with such complicated things to say! It's possible that sometimes your posts don't get answered because we are so confused about the situations you describe that we can't concentrate on the language questions.

The first one, about the water, makes no sense to me. Why would a weak stream of water splash more than a strong stream of water? I think for this you need a plumber more than a language expert!

The second situation also seems really implausable -- do you really know anyone in this situation? What kind of jobs do these people have, where no one cares if they spend their entire first hour at work an the phone? And why are their shifts so long? It doesn't sound like much of a marraige -- the two people are never at home at the same time! Emotion: crying I predict that they will have trouble having children. No, wait -- maybe I misunderstood the whole thing. You don't actually say when they get home; you only say when they leave and when they go to sleep. So I suppose it's possible that they each work an 8-hour shift and they do have some time when they are both at home and awake.

Your explanation #1 is reasonable enough, although I don't know why you would need to describe this situation to the other person who is involved in it. Explanation #2 could be simplified a bit -- if you say, "Each of us is only awake for the first hour of the other person's shift," the listener will understand that you are asleep for the rest of it.
Thank you Jackie for the explanation.

I'm trying to say that the water will not splatter but, you'll get tiny drops everywhere around the inside of the sink if you have too weak a stream of water. try it you'll maybe see what I'm talking about. If you don't see what I'm talking about, lets say the sentences did make sense. Grammatically,

Don't turn the faucet on (too) weak/strong as the water will splatter/splash everywhere.

Is the bold ok? how would you say it?

and is this grammatical ? : you'll get tiny drops everywhere around the inside of the sink if you have too weak a stream of water. (a very weak stream)

For 2 obviously your version is perfect, and I know you don't need to explain the situation to the other person involved: but is the sentence grammatical, the bold bit is what I'm concerned about.

- I'm awake and on the phone with you the first hour of your shift from 10 am to 11 am just like you're on the phone with me the first hour of mine from 10 pm to 11 pm. We sleep through all but one hour (the first hour) of each others shifts.

- We are awake for the first hour of each others shifts and sleep for the rest of the duration of one another's shifts.

Thank you so much
Hello Jackie,

Could you tell me what you think of my explanation?

Thank you for all the help

Alex
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Okay, Alex, I'll give it another look.
alc24- I'm awake and on the phone with you the first hour of your shift (from 10 am to 11 am) just like you're on the phone with me the first hour of mine (from 10 pm to 11 pm). We each sleep through all but one hour (the first hour) of the other's shifts.

- We are awake for the first hour of each other's shifts and sleep for the duration of the other's shifts.
alc24Don't turn the faucet on too weak/strong or the water will splatter/splash everywhere.

Is the bold ok? how would you say it?
I've made a few changes that, in my mind, make things a bit more clear. You don't need to say "the rest of the duration" -- "duration" means "the rest of the time." I can't really explain why I think "the other's" sounds better in a couple of places than "each other's".

Hello Khoff,

Can you pretty please with a cherry on top, tell me if you understand what I mean here and help me make it natural?

I'm trying to say that the water will not splatter but, you'll get tiny drops everywhere around the inside of the sink if you have too weak a stream of water. try it you'll maybe see what I'm talking about. If you don't see what I'm talking about, lets say the sentences did make sense. Grammatically,

1 Don't turn the faucet on (too) weak/strong as the water will splatter/splash everywhere.

Is the bold ok? how would you say it?

and is this grammatical ? : you'll get tiny drops everywhere around the inside of the sink if you have too weak a stream of water. (a very weak stream)

Thank you Khoff so very much