Hello.

I'd like to know when we can use two times more and twice as much. Also the following information's really confusing me:

Twice as much = 2 X the base. Two times more = 2 X the base + the base.
If the factory produced 1000 widgets, twice as much would be 2000 widgets; two times more would be 3000 widgets.


I hope very much for your help. Thanks in advance!
1 2
I've never heard of such a fine distinction being made between those expressions. I would have said they were the same.

Note: twice = two times

as much as = the same amount

more = additional

The 'widget' sentence pretty much explains how they are using the terms. According to the definition given there,

If I have one cup of sugar, and you have [twice / two times] as much as I do, then you have two cups of sugar.

If you have two pints of beer, and I have [twice / two times] as much as you do, then I have four pints of beer.

Are you clear on that so far?

___________

Now they're saying that 'two times more' is basically 'three times as much' because it's the original amount PLUS twice as much. So, by that logic,

If I have one cup of sugar, and you have [twice / two times] more than I do, then you have three cups of sugar.

(That is, you have as much as I (one cup) and two times that amount (two cups) in addition.)

If you have two pints of beer, and I have [twice / two times] more than you do, then I have six pints of beer.

(I have the same amount (two), and I have two times that amount (four) in additiion.)

How did that go? Did you understand that?

_____________________

X X X two times as much > XX XX XX

X X X three times as much > XXX XXX XXX

X X X two times more > X X X XX XX XX

X X X three times more > X X X XXX XXX XXX

(You can substitute 'twice' for 'two times' in the expressions above.)

CJ
Hi,

It does seem complicated once you read it, but as you become familiar with the formula,

it gets easier. I think the formula you provided is fairly understandable.

Regards
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Thank you very much, but it still seems incomprehensible to me. So, if I say

I ate seven times more apples than her (she ate 2 apples) means I ate 16 apples?

I ate seven times as much apples than her (she ate 2 apples) means I ate 14 apples?

Is my guess right?
spinymanIs my guess right?
Yes. According to the pattern you were given, this is essentially correct. The only problem is that all the examples with much are with uncountable nouns, and you have used a countable noun, apple, so you have to change much to many. And you have to be more careful with some of the little words: more than / as many as / as much as.

I ate seven times as many apples as she did.

CJ
Can I replace as she did with as her ?
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spinymanCan I replace as she did with as her ?
I would not do that. In my opinion, comparative as should have a clause after it, not just a pronoun. as her is understandable, however, and some people may accept it as grammatical.

CJ
Okay, it's much clear for me now, thanks Emotion: smile
I just don't get it. What's the point to have created such differences. Practically, who's gonna count how many apples would be in the firt sentence? I will just say I ate 14 apples more than her, rather than calculate how many times more apples after the first two ones I ate. It's just nonsense that doesn't have practical use.
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