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I'm kind of confused as to when to say 2 year or years, 2 month or months. Can you please explain it to you me? Thanks
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More context would help us zero in on your question, but here's a start.

His daughter is six years old. He has a six-year-old daughter.
My lease is for two years. I have a two-year lease.
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You use the singular when modifying a noun.

A ten-foot pole, a two-year-old daughter, a four-minute mile.
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Comments  
PhilipMore context would help us zero in on your question, but here's a start.

His daughter is six years old. He has a six-year-old daughter.
My lease is for two years. I have a two-year lease.

Why do you use "s" in the first sentence but not the second? Is it because you're describing it?
anyone?
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 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
ah.... Thanks

On study leave for 2 years or 2 year

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anonymous

On study leave for 2 years or 2 year

There are three basic forms to consider (spell out single-digit numbers when you can):

two years

two-year

two years'

"Two years" is simply that many years, like two of anything else—two dogs, two moustache combs, two galaxies. Your study leave is two years long.

"Two-year" is the way we make an adjective out of that when it comes before its noun. So, you have a two-year study leave. The hyphen gives a singular sense to "two". We do not use that form after the noun for spans of time.

"Two years'" is one way we talk about spans of time. So, you have two years' study leave.