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Which would you say?

1 I dropped my ice cream on the ground and my dad yelled at me for being too/very slow to pick it up./as I was too slow to pick it up.
2 This movie is a mix of/between comedy and action.
3 The faucet trickled/ dripped water, not allowing me to fall asleep becuase of the noise.
4 That's obviously the thing that's going to happen/what's going to happen.

Thank you
Comments  
alc241 I dropped my ice cream on the ground and my dad yelled at me for being too/very slow to pick it up./as I was too slow to pick it up.
2 This movie is a mix of/between comedy and action. (Between is also used.)

3 The faucet trickled/ dripped water, not allowing me to fall asleep becuase of the noise. ( ", the noise not allowing me to fall asleep.")

4 That's obviously the thing that's going to happen/what's going to happen.

3) The sound of the dripping faucet kept me awake all night.

4) That's obviously something which is going to happen.
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What about "Water trickled from the faucet, not allowing me to sleep./preventing me from sleeping."

Thanks
I think you need "dripped" rather than "trickled".

There is perhaps "too much sentence" here. How about: Water dripped from the faucet, keeping me awake all night. [This sounds a little more natural, although your longer version is correct.]
alc,

As suggested by earlier comment from another poster, take the advices from the experts. If your version were natural sounding, we wouldn't have made the revision.

Trickle: The river slows to a trickle. - noun usage

Rarely used as verb.
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If we were allowed to use only the most common language in every case, a lot of great literature would be relegated to the trash bin.

The only truly rare thing I see here is "The faucet trickled water." The dictionary lists the transitive usage, but I've never heard it. (It's defined as "to cause to trickle.")
The poster may prefer "trickled" for its onomatopoeic qualities.
I originally rejected it, thinking the transitive was not allowed.

<< "Water trickled from the faucet, not allowing me to sleep." >> I see nothing wrong with this version.

<< 3. "The faucet trickled/ dripped water, not allowing me to fall asleep becuase of the noise." >>

I agree with Philip that this is "too much sentence."