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I read an article in the local newspaper, and found 3 questions about grammar:

1)it's simple courtesy to move over and let other drivers by.
Q1:Should it be: it's "a" simple courtesy to move over and let other drivers by?
Q2:Should it be: ...let other drivers "pass" by?

2)If somebody cut you off, slow down and give them room to merge into your lane.
Q3:Should it be : ...and give "him/her" room to... ?

3)If you feel you are being followed too closely, you should pull over.
Q4:Can I say: If you feel you are followed too closely, you should pull over.
What 's the difference?

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Hello again Warrener

Q1:Should it be: it's "a" simple courtesy to move over and let other drivers by?

'A courtesy' as in 'an act of courtesy' is certainly possible; but 'courtesy' as in 'the quality of courtesy' seems fine as well. (In this second sense, 'courtesy' is used without 'a', and often without 'the'.)

That said, I would have written 'it's a simple act of courtesy', or 'it's only courteous'.

Q2:Should it be: ...let other drivers "pass" by?

'Pass by' usually has a sense of passing a stationary person or object. 'Let other drivers pass' would do, though.

'To let someone by' as an ellipsis for 'to let someone go by' seems idiomatic; but I would probably only use it of pedestrian movements. Other readers may differ, though.

Q3:Should it be : ...and give "him/her" room to... ?
'Them' is often used as a convenient way of saying 'him/her'.

(But many English speakers object to it, especially in written English. So if you prefer people to pay attention to your subject matter, rather than your grammar, it's probably better to rephrase any sentences where appears.)

Q4:Can I say: If you feel you are followed too closely, you should pull over.
'Being followed' puts more emphasis on the 'following' as an action in progress. 'To be followed' puts more emphasis on the 'following' as a whole:

'I was followed by a man in a brown hat.'
'I am followed everywhere by a large white rabbit.'

So in your example, I would use 'being followed', as the 'feeling' increases during the act of 'following'.

MrP
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Thanks lot