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Howdy,

1. Should I use definite articles in this sentence? Why/why not?

(The) prophets of doom have always accompanied humanity in its peregrination through (the) ages.

2. a) Should I rather say were or are in the first part of the sentence?
b) Should I use a definite article in front of human corpse(s) ?
c) Should I say human corpse or corpse-S ? Is corpse a countable or an uncountable noun?

All of a sudden we were/are able to bury the world under a thick layer of dust and rubble and strew it with charred remains of (the) human corpse(s).

3. Should I put th after the numbers or not?

The invention of the atomic bomb and later the hydrogen bomb, and the use of the former in the bombings of August 6(th) and 9(th), 1945 on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were, arguably, besides the Holocaust, the most profound and fraught with consequences events in the history of human warfare.

If you spot any mistakes in these sentences aside from my doubts I'm asking about, please let me know...

Cheers!
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anglista20081. Should I use definite articles in this sentence? Why/why not? I would not use the definite article. However, I might possibly use it if the sentence is a reference to something previously mentioned in the the broader context -- in which certain people were described and or classified as being "prophets of doom". I would need to see the broader context in order to say for sure whether I might include the definite article.

(The) prophets of doom have always accompanied humanity in its peregrination through (the) ages.

2. a) Should I rather say were or are in the first part of the sentence? NO

b) Should I use a definite article in front of human corpse(s) ? You can say "the human corpses" if you are referring to specific human corpses. If you want to refer to human corpses in a very general way, then you should not use "the".

c) Should I say human corpse or corpse-S ? Is corpse a countable or an uncountable noun? Countable: One human corpse, two human corpses.

All of a sudden we were/are able to bury the world under a thick layer of dust and rubble and strew it with (the) charred remains of (the) human corpses. The word "the" in front of "charred" is optional.

3. Should I put th after the numbers or not? You can if you like.

The invention of the atomic bomb and later the hydrogen bomb, and the use of the former in the bombings of August 6(th) and 9(th), 1945 on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were, arguably, besides the Holocaust, the most profound and fraught with consequences events in the history of human warfare. The highlighted part of the sentence is awkwardly worded in my opinion.

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Thanks a lot Yankee!
thanks a lot Yankee for your help and explanations!